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  1. #241

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    If your not on a public sewer system then where the residuals go down stream toward (Evansvlle, New Orleans and in between.) or other down stream intake collections... Then you might just be on a septic system which needs it bacteria to remain healthy long term. Processing chemistry is long erm fatal to the needed bacteria, therefore a grand cost avoidance in replacing a drain field (and all the needed dirt around it). I have the local chemical pumping and hauling fellow collect my drum full as needed. The Aussies have mentioned needing seriously limited water consumption.
    (Sigh: I did love my big Pako drum washer of years gone by...)

  2. #242
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Sigh. When that running water goes down the drain, it doesn't leave the planet, it goes back into the rivers/ocean after being treated. Just let it run...
    While this is true on a geologic time scale it is not so on shorter time scales...like those that matter to biological life forms (eg, humans). Wasting water by "letting it run" is is simply wasting water....and wasting fresh water is foolish, selfish and inconsiderate of others. Please do not waste water or any other resources.

  3. #243
    Truzi's Avatar
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    This is beginning to remind me of a Sam Kinison routine. The one about helping people in other countries, where one of the punchlines was about NOT living in a desert

    Of course I'm spoiled, living about 10 miles from Lake Erie. For us, it's not about lack of water, it's about not polluting it.
    Truzi

  4. #244
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Sigh. When that running water goes down the drain, it doesn't leave the planet, it goes back into the rivers/ocean after being treated. Just let it run.
    I'll assume that you're *not* from Australia?
    Situation here was so bad a few years ago in some places that you were only allowed a few minutes in the shower a day, they'd disconnect (or at least severely limit) your supply for watering your garden with a hose.
    I read a story from Bendigo that at one point they had 60 days' water supply left for the town on emergency rations, and a new pipeline to refill the supplies was more than 80 days left to completion.

    I've got myself set up with rainwater tanks and a booster pump, so I don't mind shoving a bit down the drain, but now that i've got the Jobo I'm planning on doing all my washing in that, give it 5 mins and change the water, doing that a few times should be enough and use 1/5th of the water I do now in the Paterson...
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  5. #245

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    Quote Originally Posted by Truzi View Post
    This is beginning to remind me of a Sam Kinison routine. The one about helping people in other countries, where one of the punchlines was about NOT living in a desert

    Of course I'm spoiled, living about 10 miles from Lake Erie. For us, it's not about lack of water, it's about not polluting it.
    One can always question the wisdom of setting up human housing in areas that are/were deserts.

  6. #246

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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    One can always question the wisdom of setting up human housing in areas that are/were deserts...
    ... flood plains, tidal estuaries, land that would be better farmed than covered with asphalt, etc.

    I don't hold out much hope...

    Doremus

  7. #247

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    ... flood plains, tidal estuaries, land that would be better farmed than covered with asphalt, etc.

    I don't hold out much hope...

    Doremus
    the more roads and tar the better.
    we need places to drive and park our vehicles
    i dont bother with city water or wells, i only use run off
    for all my water ( food, drink, bathing &c )
    tastes better than bottled or stuff out of a spigot / sill-cock
    besides when i get bored i can look at the rainbows
    ... my film and paper dont mind either...

  8. #248
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    I have lived both in Texas and in Appalacia. It's difficult for residents of both regions to understand how different the water situation is between the two places.

    The Texans would recoil in horror to hear that back home, I cooled my homebrew beer by leaving the tap running full-blast for an hour and just letting the overflow water run across the driveway instead of collecting it. They can't imagine that in certain places in the country, water falls from the sky and collects underwater in large quantities, and you can just pump it out of the ground. There is lots of water. Tons of water. It is not "wasting water" when you HAVE water.

    On the other hand, the folks up north can't understand the logic behind water conservation. They can't imagine that in certain places of the country, water is scarce, so yes, it is discouraged to drill out all your water-conserving fixtures and to run your lawn sprinklers an hour a day. The politics of water conservation are a rant for another day (certain entities, often the ones that use the most water, seem to be exempt from the rules).

    There is no optimum practice for every region. In Ohio, killing a rattlesnake can be a crime, because rattlesnakes are scarce. In Texas, they have "rattlesnake roundups" where prizes are awarded to those who kill the most rattlesnakes in a day, because rattlesnakes are common and considered pests. Neither policy is "wrong". Environmentalism requires responding to the environment you are in.
    f/22 and be there.

  9. #249

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    Running water

    I have been to places around the world where half the time the taps are dry, not a drop, literally. One wealthy town in New York let their overdevelopment get so bad that the hydrants in zillion dollar locations were barely working in the summer. Nothing was done until the fire authorities made it clear this was a fire hazard (not to mention the loss of all that real estate). So, you need not live in the desert or the middle of nowhere to not have running water.
    I am lucky enough to find water gushing from my tap every time I turn the handle. I'd like to keep it that way. Wasting water won't help. So if I can safely wash film with less water, I'd like to know how. Just because I can afford to let my darkroom tap run all day does not mean I should. And from a photographic standpoint, you cannot maintain a constant temperature with a running tap. Isn't reticulation a concern?

  10. #250

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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Sigh. When that running water goes down the drain, it doesn't leave the planet, it goes back into the rivers/ocean after being treated. Just let it run. If you think you're saving something or other by emptying and refilling, and that makes you feel good, by all means do that. I'm not sure I would follow 1930's literature for 2014 films though. Depends on which films you're using of course. You will be washing Tri-X a while to get that purple out.
    We had this discussion on another very similar thread, but again i must say the above statement is only true in such places in the world with an abundance of fresh water, and even there the environmental cost of pumping, treating and transporting said water is HUGE, and every drop that comes out of your tap matters.
    In places where fresh water is not commonly found (about 80% of the world) wasting water is a crime (literally, and where it isent, it should be).

    Even though MA has the second cleanest and plentiful water source in the world - any of my students how left a tap running and left the lab failed that assignment on the spot, those who rigged the water timers failed the class.

    Having lots of something does not mean you should not care about wasting it.

    Washing film with a little bit of water is easy:
    1. Use a hyproclearing agent which can reduce wash time by 80-90%
    2. Use a forced cascade washer (Jobo makes a fancy one which guarantees an archival wash in 5 minutes, but a simple hose pushed down the tank will do in a pinch, just watch the flow rate)
    3. Close the tap when you brush your teeth etc,...

    A note about purple kodak stuff - it is US sensitive. Wash as indicated, and disregard the purple haze - leave negs in a sleeve for an hour in some light/indirect sunlight and see it disappear if you really are not a big purple fan (or use ilford films).
    CatLABS of JP
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    www.catlabs.info | https://www.facebook.com/CatLABS.of.JP | www.jobo-usa.com



 

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