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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    It sound like your FP4 was underexposed, and therefore was automatically printed up. Under what lighting conditions were the pix shot? Were you pushing the limits of usability of a 125 film, or were you getting good exposures with plenty of room to spare? I agree that FP4 can get a tad flat on the high end of things if you are not placing and developing to suit, not to mention that it has less latitude. However, IMO when it is nailed it provides clearly "better" results than b/w C-41 film, from a technical standpoint. (Not that I believe the Fuji film is bad, mind you). Subjective opinion, of course, but it sounds to me like something went wrong with the FP4.
    I love the stuff.


    Kiron Kid
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Neopan 400CN.jpg  

  2. #22
    Matt5791's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Interesting stuff.

    I have never used Ilfords processing, or HARMAN technology. Will have to try both.

    Ted
    Hi Ted - ILFORD is the brand name of Harman Technology Limited - ie the same company. They only use the Ilford brand for black and white products - Inkjet and other products carry Harman as a brand.

    Ilford branded inkjet paper (eg. Galerie) and Ilfochrome products are from the other Ilford company, based in Switzerland.

    Matt

  3. #23

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    Do you mean Neopan 400CN?

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajuk View Post
    Do you mean Neopan 400CN?

    I use and very much like the Neopan 400CN & the traditional B/W Neopan 400.

    Kiron Kid
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails An Uncertain Dignity.jpg   Child & bread roll.jpg   Jane & Oleg -dancingB-W.jpg  

  5. #25

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    I have to just add my two-pennyworth that I use the Ilford B&W service, and am totally impressed. Spotless negs and prints, lovely depth and pin-sharp prints....it has genuinely restimulated my interest in B&W!

    (Usual disclaimers....just a customer, no connection with Ilford/Harman, etc. )

  6. #26

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    Can I ask how 400CN's die clouds react to shadows in terms of grain? XP-2 Super's blacks and shadows are the grainiest tones and I would assume that Neopan CN does a similar thing, but I'm hoping not as much. I have been looking for the idea low-light film in a C-41 process and have stopped using XP-2 in my indoor work for this reason.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Dear All,

    An interesting thread, mostly about the processing, at HARMAN I guess you know we are passionate about printing mono films on mono papers, so many D&P houses now print onto colour so we put our money where our mouth was and now offer our own service, proper processing, C41 mono as well as normal mono and printing using a converted FUJI Frontier ( with the great help and support of FUJI ) onto our monochrome paper. The results I think are unbelievable.....this is not an ADVERT for the service, just to say that we are
    doing a lot of work in 2009 to encourage specialist D&P and Labs around the World to look at the system.

    Its going so well we plan to widen the range of services this year.


    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
    I subscribe to what Mr Galley said here.
    Tried the IlfordLab and they are the best company for developing b&w on real b&w paper, period!
    They're cheap too!

  8. #28
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RF Dude View Post
    Can I ask how 400CN's die clouds react to shadows in terms of grain? XP-2 Super's blacks and shadows are the grainiest tones and I would assume that Neopan CN does a similar thing, but I'm hoping not as much. I have been looking for the idea low-light film in a C-41 process and have stopped using XP-2 in my indoor work for this reason.
    Welcome RF Dude.

    Yep, in general, C41 films show grain more in the shadows, less in the highlights. Extra exposure helps reduce grain for C41 films but that's not really the direction it sounds like you want to go. I do find that when shot at box speed though (no cheating toward 800 on your 400 speed film) and print so that the scene looks like low light it gives very nice results. If I try to print too light (get normal portrait brightness) or reduce C41 film exposure, I get grainy shadows and the negatives get hard to print well.

    "Traditional" B&W films generally show more grain in the highlight areas and less in the shadows. Minimizing exposure and development minimizes grain. Pushing traditional film does increase grain. Personally I use Delta 400 for most of my low light stuff and can shoot down to about 1600 without changing development.

    There's a bit of give and take here depending on your subject matter. For example C41 films may give you "whiter eyes".

    This is also highly dependant on how you print, testing is important because my sensibilities and processes aren't the same as yours, of that I'm sure.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 12-22-2012 at 04:12 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Fixed an "autocorrect"
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #29

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    I hadn't realised this was a 4 year old thread. So Ted are you still of the opinion that the chromogenic Neopan produces better prints than Ilford FP4+ now that you have had 4 years to consider and evaluate or was it just down to the lab being less able to handle FP4 negs and possibly using RA4 paper?

    Thanks

  10. #30

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    I burn my Neopan 400, Neopan 400CN and XP-2 at 320 and get very nice results. If I need speed, I use Neopan 1600 or push Neopan 400 or Delta 400. I have not found the shadows to have excessive grain.
    Last edited by Kiron Kid; 12-22-2012 at 10:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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