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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley View Post
    Tmax-2 is highly forgiving in development, at least with Pyrocat-HD. Go with it, shoot many sheets, learn its development, and never look back.
    My experience with TMAX 400 (TMY-2) developed in Pyrocat fully agrees with Alex Hawley's.

    I have not yet tried HP-5.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by optique View Post
    Ok guys, I ordered a box of that inexpensive foma 200 from freestyle, and some HP5+.

    My three camera mistakes so far with my Crown: 1. did not reverse the darkside after taking a shot. 2. scratched film while [un]loading holder, 3. shadow self portraits too many times 4. too embarrased to say. <face turns red>

    Developing has been relatively fine, but I had a lot of roll film experience. Did a 4 negative contact print on one 8x10 sheet, 3 came out looking good but one was severely underexposed, compared to other three.

    You all have a good day.
    Steve.
    First, that's not bad for a beginner. Second, don't be embarassed. We've all screwed up one time or another. I can't begin to recount here just how many times I've done it. That's why earlier in this thread I wrote what I did about using the less expensive film to start.

    Now go out and have some fun with your Crown.

    Does your's have a working rangefinder? Mine does. It's great fun taking it out and using it hand held for street photography.
    Frank Schifano

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    First, that's not bad for a beginner. Second, don't be embarassed. We've all screwed up one time or another. I can't begin to recount here just how many times I've done it. That's why earlier in this thread I wrote what I did about using the less expensive film to start.

    Now go out and have some fun with your Crown.

    Does your's have a working rangefinder? Mine does. It's great fun taking it out and using it hand held for street photography.
    Frank, your words are too kind and I thank you for your encouragement.

    The rangefinder apparently is inoperative, something that was not disclosed when I bought it. I might have used it because the glass on this thing seems very dim. I hope the Shen Hao will be brighter.

    I am off to take some evenly lit closeups so I can gauge my ability to meter and develop simple scenes, plus test the focus on the lens. I have a lingering suspicion my shots are unsharp. With contact prints, they should be perfect, right? I can't effectively enlarge because I just have a 100mm lens.

    Thanks to all.
    Steve.

  4. #24

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    I've used both TMY and HP5 for Southwest landscapes, and they both work well. I've also used 400TX in 35 mm with great success. My "feel" is that TMY may be the way to go, but it is a personal thing. I disagree about wanting an unforgiving film. You want pictures above all, and a forgiving film will at least give you something. Working in the Southwest involves a lot of long distance travel and a lot of time. You don't redo your work easily. A forgiving film will still show the student (and the rest of us) the errors in his ways, but it is more likely to produce usable results.

  5. #25
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    Ride the horse that brought you. If you started using tri x 400 in 120, then try 320 tx in 4x5. If you used HP5 in 35mm or 120, then use it. You already have a lot of variables with the new camera, why add one more? It's may be cheaper in the long run, because you may end up using less. Just my 2 cents.
    Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    First, that's not bad for a beginner. Second, don't be embarassed. We've all screwed up one time or another.
    Yeah, welcome to Large Format where the flubs are always bigger and there are more chances to excel! :rolleyes:

    Frank brings up an excellent point. With a forgiving film, you have lot's better chance of still having a usable negative even with a high degree of under/over exposure.

    That's another reason I recommended TMY-2. Its even more forgiving than Tri-X. When I first started using it this year, I was overexposing by a good 3 stops just to be on the safe side (and being too impatient for proper film testing before I began). I got negs so dense that they printed with grade 0 filter on Ilford MG. The best solution was to print with split grade filtering, 00 and 5.0. Still, had it been tri-x or something else, I doubt I could have made a print. TMY-2 will produce Grade 2 negs easily rating it at 400. And also, if you get into a low-light situation, TMY-2 has the least reciprocity correction of any film on the market.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by optique View Post
    The rangefinder apparently is inoperative, something that was not disclosed when I bought it. I might have used it because the glass on this thing seems very dim. I hope the Shen Hao will be brighter.
    Yeah, the groundglass on the crown can be kind of dim and it gets worse if you don't open the lens fully to focus. My practice when focusing on the ground glass is to focus with the lens wide open, then stop it down to the shooting aperture. I use an old 50 mm SLR lens off an old Petri FT as a magnifier to check the groundglass for critical focus. The lens is worthless as a taking lens. The aperture mechanism and focusing helix both gave up the ghost long, long ago.

    About the rangefinder, my Crown has the top mounted rangefinder and it didn't work when I got it. The glass bits inside were shot, but the mechanism was fine. I replaced the mirrors and used a small piece of orange cinegel over one window to add contrast. There is no prism so it was easy, and bingo, one working rangefinder coming up. Adjusting the infinity stops was pretty easy too. If I knew better when I bought the camera I would have held out for one with a good side mounted Kalart rangefinder. Those are more easily adjustable for different lenses without the need for replacing cams that are hard to find and a pain to set up.
    Frank Schifano

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by optique View Post
    I might have used it because the glass on this thing seems very dim. I hope the Shen Hao will be brighter.
    The old ground glasses were all dim. That's pretty typical for a camera of that era. Not sure if the stock glass on the Shen will be any brighter. A new glass with a "bright" grind or a Fresnel is certainly worth the investment.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  9. #29
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    Can A dummy ask why you folks reach for ISO 400 for landscape why not ISO 100 or ISO 50 for landscape , why reach so high when you can control you developing to get your shadows and highlights ?
    Lauren MacIntosh
    When one's life Ends, then one becomes Life's history !

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by seawolf66 View Post
    Can A dummy ask why you folks reach for ISO 400 for landscape why not ISO 100 or ISO 50 for landscape , why reach so high when you can control you developing to get your shadows and highlights ?
    Here's my major reasons.

    1. Shutter speeds - with LF, apertures of f/22 and smaller are necessary. That puts the shutter speed down slow. Wind is a major factor on my neck of the prairie. With low light, exposures in the seconds, not fractions of seconds. The extra two or three stops of shutter speed is worth it.

    2. I like being able to use just one, or at the most, two films to cover everything. That's why I'm grateful for TMY-2. It can cover everything.

    I've used plenty of slow and medium speed film for landscapes. Still use FP4+ for the 7x17 because TMY-2 wasn't available when I bought 7x17 film. I still have a few boxes of Polaroid Type 55 to finish off. It shoots at asa 20 or 25 for the negative. Works great for landscapes in my area, but shutter speeds are long, and I typically need a filter of some sort.

    I have yet to realize any advantage of using a slow film versus a fast film. If I need a long exposure for its visual effect, I can easily get it by stopping down and perhaps over exposing a stop or two. As I said, I've shot a lot of slow and a lot of fast film out beyond the town, and I can't tell any difference in the results. Either one will do.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

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