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  1. #21

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    Colin, dilute Rodinal and stand/semi-stand MAY be one way to get around this, another would be to use one of the pyro devs or something like dilute D-23. Or, the scenc could simply be beyond the range of the film; beyond its ability to record the differences between the dark and light areas.

    Here's a thread that is a fun read:http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/00RQbd

  2. #22
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Well, Gort seems to have made the OP, but his name was really Gnut. (read "Farewell to the Master" to figure that one out ) In any event, I say use what works for you. Not what someone else suggests.

    PE

  3. #23
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    Semi-stand 1:50, I buy it by the case and I have been using it for over thirty years beginning with Panatomic-X, by far the best combination of all time.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  4. #24
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    Very true, the pyro developers are good at extreme compensation too. Pyrocat-MC and HD are the ones I have experience with. They are not that good at stand development, though, in my experience. I had more occurrences of uneven development using Pyrocat for stand (semistand with 3min agitation intervals worked just fine) than with Rodinal.
    I think at least Pyrocat was more designed for continuous agitation rather than minimal agitation.
    Even so, just in normal development schemes, with agitation once per minute, Pyrocat is an awesome developer for compensation.
    - Thomas

    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    Colin, dilute Rodinal and stand/semi-stand MAY be one way to get around this, another would be to use one of the pyro devs or something like dilute D-23. Or, the scenc could simply be beyond the range of the film; beyond its ability to record the differences between the dark and light areas.

    Here's a thread that is a fun read:http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/00RQbd
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    In any event, I say use what works for you. Not what someone else suggests.

    PE
    Thanks for directing me to the source of Gort...very cool...it appears the movie was lifted almost directly from that author's work. I still like Gort the best though (smiling here).

    About your advice above...yes, exactly and its been my path all along. Experiment then print and look then know what works for you. Simple and effective. Did you think PE that I was looking to be told what to do? If so its not the case and not the spirit of the post.

    Will you contribute your Rodinal experience to the thread?

    MH

  6. #26
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    Well, MH, I don't use Rodinal although I have mixed up several batches experimentally to look at it chemically. I understood your intent from the OP though. I was just chiming in.

    BTW, the last line of the book is quite chilling and is the reason for the title "Farewell to the Master". The woman walks over to the robot and says "Tell your master I said goodbye" and the robot, for the first time, turns and speaks. He says "You misunderstand, I am the master!" Only showing that if you create someone to have power over you, he will use it and become the master. So, the novelette had a double entendre and is appropriate here.

    Don't let another's techniques become your master. Do what works and become your own master! That is the thought that ran through my mind as I read these posts.

    PE

  7. #27

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    How did you meter?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Colin, it is one of the best ways to deal with such range of brightness in a scene. Try it. If you look in my gallery you'll see some neg scans from inside the St Paul Cathedral. Sharp window light and dark indoor illumination in the same scene in good harmony. Couldn't have done it without the Rodinal / semistand regimen I used. I would have blown the highlights.
    - Thomas
    Thomas,

    How did you meter the scenes in the cathedral? Did you know in advance that you would use Rodinal and stand development? I'm having trouble getting consistant results. Consistant from picture to picture. Varying light & brightness ranges for sure. I was just curious if I need to do something different with my metering for the 1:100 stand technique.

    Flat, even light and underexposure seem to give me the best negatives. I am also interested in church interiors. So far, I haven't had much luck.

  8. #28

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    30 seconds initial and then 2 soft inversions per minute works great for me.

    1+50 w/ Tri-x in small tanks.

  9. #29
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    Thanks for these posts...very interesting. I think the trend for agitating Rodinal with Tri-X is beginning to appear...looks like every other minute and very gently is what is working for most (or thats how I'm interpreting this). I've just changed from 2 pretty agressive inversions per minute to one gentler inversion every other minute and already the results show a difference. Negs are hanging and I can't wait to see the 11X14's.

    Thread is still open to anyone who wants to contribute...

    Michael

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Well, MH, I don't use Rodinal although I have mixed up several batches experimentally to look at it chemically. I understood your intent from the OP though. I was just chiming in.

    BTW, the last line of the book is quite chilling and is the reason for the title "Farewell to the Master". The woman walks over to the robot and says "Tell your master I said goodbye" and the robot, for the first time, turns and speaks. He says "You misunderstand, I am the master!" Only showing that if you create someone to have power over you, he will use it and become the master. So, the novelette had a double entendre and is appropriate here.

    Don't let another's techniques become your master. Do what works and become your own master! That is the thought that ran through my mind as I read these posts.

    PE
    A very creative reference though a tad bit dramatic parsing of what's really going on here don't you think? My interpretation of the OP's intent with this thread is to simply compile different users' preferences, not to set out slavishly copying another photographer's magic bullet. There are lots of techniques that work and work well so it can't be as simple as just "doing what works". I used PMK for 20 years with great results before stumbling on a post in this user group that changed my technique with this developer for the better. Did that post turn me into a humonculus? Feeling out what works best for others is a great way of further fleshing out the characteristics of a developer that you might already know and love.

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