Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,557   Posts: 1,545,151   Online: 969
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #11
    ted_smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    uk
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    396
    Images
    1
    Right, OK, now I'm confused....

    Is it ISO 3200 film, or is it ISO 1000 film? Whilst I realise that you can shoot films at ISO speeds that vary from it's standard norm, I don't want to take any risks with this shoot. So if the manufacturer rates it at ISO3200, I think I'll shoot it at that. But if it's actually ISO 1000, then I'll shoot it at that.

    I am thankful for all the answers above, but I want to know the 'safe' ISO value to use - one that I know I'll correct (enough) exposures. Is it 3200, 1600, 1000 or something else? The setting on the box says 3200.

    Ted
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  2. #12
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Right, OK, now I'm confused....

    Is it ISO 3200 film, or is it ISO 1000 film? Whilst I realise that you can shoot films at ISO speeds that vary from it's standard norm, I don't want to take any risks with this shoot. So if the manufacturer rates it at ISO3200, I think I'll shoot it at that. But if it's actually ISO 1000, then I'll shoot it at that.

    I am thankful for all the answers above, but I want to know the 'safe' ISO value to use - one that I know I'll correct (enough) exposures. Is it 3200, 1600, 1000 or something else? The setting on the box says 3200.

    Ted
    Ted,

    You should really read the data sheet, and/or the plethora of other recent posts about this film. It is not confusing. It is a 1000 film in the same way that HP5 is a 400 film and FP4 is a 125 film. Simple.

    It is an ISO 1000 film no matter what you rate it at. A film only has one ISO. Anything else is simply a "lie" to your meter for purposes of calibration/compensation, making a blanket under or over exposure, and/or to be able to get a light reading, and is called an EI. Rating the film at 3200 is exactly the same thing as rating an ISO 400 film at EI 1250 or rating an ISO 125 film at EI 400. It underexposes the film across the board, plain and simple.

    Regardless of what EI you use, ISO is unaffected. You can have minor increases in density in your shadows with extended development, but it is really only an increase in fog anyhow, which raises shadow tone in the print, but does not add shadow detail.

    The reason the film pushes well is not magic. It simply handles underexposure well because of its inherently low contrast (due to being a fast film), therefore it does not lose shadow detail upon underexposure as much as slower films do. Because of this, it is not the film to use if you want deep pools of black in your print. If you want that, I would rate it higher than 4,000 at the least.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 12-09-2008 at 04:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Greece
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,322
    It's a 1000 ISO film that has good push capability. It can be safely pushed to 1600 with very good results. Most people will probably say that it's nice at 3200, while some others will dislike it. Push processing is a compromise anyway, so what matters is how much you can sacrifice. If a lot, 6400 might be ok for some applications.
    Last edited by Anon Ymous; 12-09-2008 at 03:30 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Typo

  4. #14
    rossawilson1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    salisbury, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    154
    If you set it to either ISO3200 or ISO1000 and expose as normal then develop as instructed you'll get a picture either way. The film won't fail at either setting but it will look different in terms of grain and contrast. Obviously you'll get less grain and more detail using the lower ISO1000 setting but that doesn't matter a jot if you can't get enough light to expose it in the first place, in which case use ISO3200. Better to have grain and a picture than no grain and no picture.

    I don't know what you're using it for but I use it at night in cities without a tripod. It gives me a workable shutter speed and aperture and I love the quality of the images it produces. I wouldn't otherwise be able to get these pictures if I rated it lower.. If I could though, I would.
    Last edited by rossawilson1; 12-09-2008 at 03:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    ISO rating: 1,000

    Recommended EI (exposure index) - whatever you like between 800 and 25,000. More than 6,400 is challenging in obtaining usable negatives.

    I use it at EI 3200 and process either in HC-110 dil B or Ilfotec DD-X according to Ilford's instructions for developing as if the film was exposed at EI 6400.

    It's an awesome film with stunning tonal reproduction and grain. Next roll I shoot will be developed with Rodinal, so for that purpose I've lowered my EI to 1,600 since Rodinal isn't exactly a speed enhancing developer.

    Attached file is from a medium format 645 neg, developed in Ilfotec DD-X, shot at EI 3,200, developed according to Ilford's instructions for EI 6,400. Then printed on Fotokemika Emaks Grade 2 paper using Weston's amidol developer. It doesn't show here, but there's detail in 95% of the shadow areas of this print.

    Good luck.

    - Thomas
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 01_Erin.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #16
    MikeSeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Prospect (Louisville), KY, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,062
    What they said. You're asking for a single ironclad answer when there isn't one. You should find out what developer your lab is going to use--likely Xtol or D76. If it is one of those, or another than maintains decent film speed, you're set.

    Pick an EI to shoot at (I've gotten great results with this film at EI 1600 with Xtol straight; but you'll get good results from 1000 to 1600) and MAKE SOME TESTS. Surely you aren't going to shoot an important job with a film you've never used before, right?
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  7. #17
    ted_smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    uk
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    396
    Images
    1
    Surely you aren't going to shoot an important job with a film you've never used before, right?
    Well, yes and no. It's not a paying shoot, butI'm not sure if I'll get a second chance. I have loads of Fuji Neopan 1600NC that I intend to use, but I have two rolls of Delta 3200 too that I bought in case I run out of the Neopan.

    Also, I think I was getting myself confused with ISO speeds and EI's. I wasn't sure what people meant when they say "EI1600" etc but having read http://photo.net/leica-rangefinders-forum/009Wt3 I realise the EI is a chosen deviation from the ISO.
    Last edited by ted_smith; 12-09-2008 at 05:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  8. #18
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Well, yes and no. It's not a paying shoot, butI'm not sure if I'll get a second chance. I have loads of Fuji Neopan 1600NC that I intend to use, but I have two rolls of Delta 3200 too that I bought in case I run out of the Neopan.

    Also, I think I'm getting myself confused with ISO speeds and EI's. I'm not sure what people mean when they say "EI1600" etc. That's foxing me a bit.
    EI means exposure index. It has nothing to do with any physical properties of your film (ISO being one of these properties). You could "rate" your film at EI 47 billion and it would not change the actual sensitivity of the film to light (ISO). "Rate" means simply to use an EI. It might be the same as the ISO, and it might not be. It really doesn't matter because an EI is not a physical property of anything. An EI is simply what you use to figure exposure; a required input into the exposure calculation, either in your head or on a light meter. To figure exposure based on a known level of light (EV for exposure value), you need to know three factors: f stop, shutter speed, and EI. Your EI is what you tell your meter, and your ISO is what your film actually is.

    EI is to be tweaked an fiddled with at will in order to give you predictable results, a reading in low light, and/or special effects.

    One reason to use an EI that does not match the ISO is if you have done tests to determine that for your shooting and developing parameters, using the same EI as the ISO is giving you more or less shadow density than you want (usually less, though sometimes more, which usually means a slow shutter).

    Another reason would be to be amplify your meter's signal so that you can get an EV reading in low light conditions (*any* reading at all versus no reading). You could then adjust that reading back down to your working EI, or just underexpose to match that EV at the desired shutter/aperture settings. I used to do this all the time with my Canon FD 12% center patch meters before I got my spot meter. I would set the meter to max EI just to get any reading, then I would take that reading and adjust it down to what it would be for whatever speed film I was actually using.

    Yet another reason would be if you wanted to make a blanket over or under exposure through the whole roll, either out of necessity to shoot hand held, or to achieve some special effect that you want, such as high or low contrast, high grain, etc. This last one is known as EC, or exposure compensation.

    SO, you have EV, EI, and EC to confuse you more!

    In review:

    1. EV (exposure value)- an amount of light read by a meter
    2. EI (exposure index) - what you tell your meter so it can give you a set of equivalent exposures for a certain EV
    3. EC (exposure compensation) - lying to your meter in order to make a blanket over or under exposure

    In a practical sense, I would save the Delta for another time, and shoot all the same film for your shoot, for sake of consistency.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 12-09-2008 at 06:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #19
    ted_smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    uk
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    396
    Images
    1
    2F2F - thanks ever so much for taking the time to write all that. It is much appreciated and makes a lot o sense.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  10. #20
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    Right, OK, now I'm confused....

    Is it ISO 3200 film, or is it ISO 1000 film? Whilst I realise that you can shoot films at ISO speeds that vary from it's standard norm, I don't want to take any risks with this shoot. So if the manufacturer rates it at ISO3200, I think I'll shoot it at that. But if it's actually ISO 1000, then I'll shoot it at that.

    I am thankful for all the answers above, but I want to know the 'safe' ISO value to use - one that I know I'll correct (enough) exposures. Is it 3200, 1600, 1000 or something else? The setting on the box says 3200.

    Ted
    ISO is a massively huge set of international standards, for film speed, the ISO speed rating means that when exposed at the number provided, using the specified subject matter and processed according to the specified processing methods and in the specified chemistries for the specified time, at the specified temperature. You will get a negative, that when measured using the specified methods you get a result within a specified range, The manufacturer must keep strict documentation of all of this.

    As others have said, Delta 3200 has an ISO of 1000, but is easily pushed, following Ilford's instructions to 3200, doesn't mean that it falls within the range specified by ISO, but lots of people push and pull films, use different chemistries, temperatures and times and get good looking results when printed using their own methods. The real key to predictable results, is to be consistent in processing.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin