Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,197   Posts: 1,531,411   Online: 889
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    Be careful with glass botttles containing solutions as they may shatter when the contents freeze.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eastern Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by ZoneIII View Post
    I froze my mixed E6 chemistry at the suggestion of someone in these forums who insisted that it was the way to go. Unfortunately, it ruined the chemistry and an entire batch of film. Never again!
    Did you freeze the concentrates or the mixed working solutions? If the latter, it would not have "ruined" your chems. I've been doing this for years and have never experienced a single failure or ruined roll of film. I processed 4 rolls 3 weekends ago from frozen stock and all chems thawed perfectly with no precipitates. All solutions were clear (minus the Bleach and CD of course) with no evidence of any components failing to redissolve.

    As for your ruined chems, what was their physical appearance after thawing? Did they look different than freshly mixed chems? Did you process any film with that same batch before freezing? Some additional info would be appreciated.

  3. #13
    hrst's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,300
    Images
    1
    I have found that dropping temperature extends the shelf life by reducing oxidation greatly.

    However, just to be 100% sure, I wouldn't recommend going below 10 deg.C. Even this should give a very nice effect in many cases, maybe doubling the shelf life compared to room temperature storage, or better.

    Personally, I store XTOL, C-41 and E6 solutions (not bleach, as it keeps perfectly at room temp) at 4 degC without any problems.

    My test earlier showed that XTOL stored at 4 deg.C in a partially filled bottle with a lot of air kept as well as carefully squeezed bottle at the room temp, while a partially filled bottle at the room temp was spoiled quickly. So, I'd conduct that displacing all the air and storing at reduced temperatures would give a very long shelf life. Just don't go too low --- it may work but do it by your own risk!

  4. #14
    thicktheo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    109
    Images
    83
    So... I put a (plastic) bottle of stock Microphen in the freezer, in order to get it cool fast (from 30c to usable 20), then I forgot about it and it spent six or seven hours in the freezer. When I remembered to take it out, it was totally frozen.

    ...and the question is, what happens now? Can I use that Microphen again? It's only been used 5 times and it's a shame to throw it away, but I (obviously) wouldn't want to risk destroying my films.

  5. #15
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,496
    Images
    28
    Thaw it out, see if it's homogenous or not.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    Do not refrigerate or freeze any photographic solutions unless the manufacturer says that it is OK. I know of only one and that is Ethol TEC. The manufacturer suggests that refrigeration will increase the product life.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,535
    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    For example, the freezing point of glacial acetic acid is 15 degrees (high 50s in the old reckoning).
    I remember seeing, a long time ago in a college lab store, a gallon glass bottle of glacial acetic acid which had shattered in a sudden cold snap over the Christmas hols, despite low heating being on.
    It's not the sort of stuff that you want to find running down walls and over the floor as it unfreezes again!

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    Many people are unaware that glacial acetic acid is also a fire hazard.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #19
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    The worst one for 'freezing' is TEA (Tri Etho Amine I think). It sets up below 20C. In the winter I store it on top of the hot air plenum outside my basement darkroom so it is ready to be poured.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #20
    thicktheo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    109
    Images
    83
    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    Thaw it out, see if it's homogenous or not.
    It is homogenous. It looks like it did before I accidentally froze it.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin