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  1. #131
    clayne's Avatar
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    I've never had prints, which have been pressed in a dry mount, return to the curl they had prior to the press. Theory may be one thing, but practice shows that once you press prints and place them in storage they do not significantly curl again.

    I do zero squeegeeing. I simply pull the prints from the washer, give them a final rinse them off in running water, and hang a bottom corner with plastic clothespins. After they dry and exhibit typical corner curling, they go in the 210M for 1-2 mins at ~200F where upon removal they'll have a gradual slope from corner to corner. Place in a clamshell and within 1 day they're pragmatically flat.

    I don't use any kind of corrugated board, screens, etc. One just needs a press.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  2. #132
    A49
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    Alternative method to get FB paper dry and flat without dry mount press

    This method I learned about 20 years ago from my photography teacher J.Janus...If you dont need the high gloss, then a way of getting FB paper photos dry and absolutely flat without a press is sticking them on a glass pane: You put the still wet sheet of FB paper on the glass pane, so that you can see the picture. Then you carefully clean the surface from water drops, a little bit but not too much with a soft sponge.

    All the the edges of your photo you fasten with a special adhesive tape on the pane. The tape is made of paper and is for instance used to fasten water colour papers on a board. Therefore this tape should be available in shops for artistry equipment. This tape is not self-adhesive. You have to wetting it a bit with water (use the sponge again) on the adhesive side. The tape should stick with it´s one half on the photo´s edges and with the other half on the glass pane. It has to overlap in the corners of the photo so that the photo is completely surrounded by the tape.

    If this is done you have to wait a few hours until the photo is totally dry. Then you can carefully cut it along the edges from the glass pane with a cutter. When using this drying method you have to make the picture a litltle bit smaller than the FB paper. It is because a part of the adhesive tape stays unremovable sticking on the border of your photo paper and you have to cut it away in the final step.

    I used this method many times primary for large formats about 16 x 20 inch and larger (for the smaller sizes drying with a mounting press is easier and faster) and it works very well. In the drying process the paper shrinks and therefore becomes flat out of itself. With the single weight papers it can happen that they burst during the drying, so check it before starting with this method and a lot of photos of the thin paper type. The double weight or thicker FB paper never made any problems.

    Anyone who understood? Further questions?

    Andreas

  3. #133
    Chriscc123's Avatar
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    if it already hasn't been answered, all my fiber curls while im trying to print... bit hard to get focused edges, its a bit old, most likely expired in early 2000, but still prints fine
    What is one to do as one watches humanity slowly destroy itself?

  4. #134

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    My method for flat fiber is:
    - let prints dry 24 hours
    - put two prints back to back in archival sleeves
    - then put all the sleeves in between two heavy books (make sure no crap on the book surfaces)
    - put 50 pounds of free weights on top and leave it that way for a week

    works perfectly.

  5. #135
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I am printing a portfolio right now for a photographer , 50 images 2 - 20 x24's each, this will not be mounted and I have been worried about **flatness** this for the period I have been printing this rather large project.

    Solution
    I have a controlled humidity in my darkroom, so when finished I will pump up the humidity and store the prints in the room over a couple of days, then I will move my smaller hot press into the darkroom and carefully hot press each print and then move them out to normal humidity conditions , in sleeves and in boxes to hold them flat.

    This will probably be my new approach to print flattening.
    In Toronto Ontario, we have four distinct seasons, during the winter months lets say from Nov 16 to April 15 the humidity drops very low and give us printers a huge amount of problems, therefore I have humidified the whole lab to counteract this damm problem.
    During summer the normal humidity is high and things go easy, but I print year round so we need this solution for 6 months of the year.

  6. #136

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    I never heard anyone mention this. I treated my prints with Sistan and they curled A LOT less. Just some edges rising up, not like buckling that I usually get. I used Ilford MGIV FB Glossy and AGFA StabAG for this.

    I usually dry for 24 hours, Hot press, then in between glass plates with thin glossy release paper on top for 10 minutes or so.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Likely a flat bed dryer would suit you better.
    All that is needed is some corrugated board,
    the blotter paper, and prints. Top off with
    what you have for weighting the stack.

    For even drying the board and blotters need
    to be over size the prints by an inch or two.
    I prefer polyester sheets to blotter because
    polyester does not wet; does not blot.

    From the bottom; corrugated board, blotter,
    prints, blotter, prints, blotter, board. Print
    emulsions should face each other. Continue
    upward as needed. Weight on top. Slow,
    cool, gentile, drying; a few days. Dan
    Is it ok to put the prints in the stack fully wet, or do they have to be somewhat dry. I am just concerned about the emulsion sticking to the "blotter material". Also, is there any particular brand of polyester material that you would recommend?

    Thanks,
    Chris Maness

  8. #138
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A49 View Post
    Alternative method to get FB paper dry and flat without dry mount press

    This method I learned about 20 years ago from my photography teacher J.Janus...If you dont need the high gloss, then a way of getting FB paper photos dry and absolutely flat without a press is sticking them on a glass pane: You put the still wet sheet of FB paper on the glass pane, so that you can see the picture. Then you carefully clean the surface from water drops, a little bit but not too much with a soft sponge.

    All the the edges of your photo you fasten with a special adhesive tape on the pane. The tape is made of paper and is for instance used to fasten water colour papers on a board. Therefore this tape should be available in shops for artistry equipment. This tape is not self-adhesive. You have to wetting it a bit with water (use the sponge again) on the adhesive side. The tape should stick with it´s one half on the photo´s edges and with the other half on the glass pane. It has to overlap in the corners of the photo so that the photo is completely surrounded by the tape.

    If this is done you have to wait a few hours until the photo is totally dry. Then you can carefully cut it along the edges from the glass pane with a cutter. When using this drying method you have to make the picture a litltle bit smaller than the FB paper. It is because a part of the adhesive tape stays unremovable sticking on the border of your photo paper and you have to cut it away in the final step.

    I used this method many times primary for large formats about 16 x 20 inch and larger (for the smaller sizes drying with a mounting press is easier and faster) and it works very well. In the drying process the paper shrinks and therefore becomes flat out of itself. With the single weight papers it can happen that they burst during the drying, so check it before starting with this method and a lot of photos of the thin paper type. The double weight or thicker FB paper never made any problems.

    Anyone who understood? Further questions?

    Andreas
    This is what I do and it works just fine. I've never had paper "burst" on me, but I do use double weight paper.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
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  9. #139

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    I searched this thread a few different ways, and didn't find anything on this, but how effective are thermostatic dryers like this for fast drying?: http://freestylephoto.biz/2032-Premi...ryer-Model-T2C

    Also, I am probably going to try the tape-to-glass method mentioned earlier. I have a bunch of the water-activated linen hinging tape (acid-free) that I used for matting. Is there any reason i couldn't use this instead of watercolor tape? Thanks in advance.

  10. #140
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbphoto View Post
    I searched this thread a few different ways, and didn't find anything on this, but how effective are thermostatic dryers like this for fast drying?: http://freestylephoto.biz/2032-Premi...ryer-Model-T2C
    Since I can't afford a dry-mount press I just use one of the dryers you linked to above. But I cut two pieces of acid free rag to fit the bed, and I sandwich my dry print in between the two sheets, and then clamp the canvas down. It makes the prints flat enough to hang behind an over-mat and stay flat.
    It's like a poor man's version of a dry-mount press.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh



 

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