Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,968   Posts: 1,558,486   Online: 1068
      
Page 17 of 20 FirstFirst ... 711121314151617181920 LastLast
Results 161 to 170 of 197
  1. #161
    jeroldharter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,958
    Images
    1
    Don't do it twice. I gave up on screens because I could not predict when I would get "screen marks" or embossing on the print. It did not matter if they were emulsion up or down. I had no problems for a long time, and then problems which I could not troubleshoot. Now I hang the prints back to back from a line with no problems and better initial flatness.
    Jerold Harter MD

  2. #162
    Doc W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    139
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    Don't do it twice. I gave up on screens because I could not predict when I would get "screen marks" or embossing on the print. It did not matter if they were emulsion up or down. I had no problems for a long time, and then problems which I could not troubleshoot. Now I hang the prints back to back from a line with no problems and better initial flatness.
    I have never tried this because I was worried that they would get stuck together. Does this not happen?

  3. #163
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,432
    Images
    46
    I've been using screens for a while now with no issues, prints go on screen face up.

    I do not squeegee. I lean the dripping print on the screen at a steep, almost straight up angle for about 10 minutes to let most of the water run off. Then I put the screen in the rack and let it dry for about a day.

    I use a dry mount press to flatten the prints after they are already dry, by putting a print between two clean mat boards when the press is cool... Turning it on for a few minutes (just warm, not hot), then turning it off and leaving it for most of a day.

    The prints come out "almost" flat... I have seen some flatter prints come to me in the LFF print exchange. So I know there is a better way.

  4. #164
    sly
    sly is offline
    sly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Nanaimo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,367
    Images
    219
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    I have never tried this because I was worried that they would get stuck together. Does this not happen?
    Back-to-back, emulsion side out. They don't stick together. RC prints stick together and never come apart.
    If I have an odd number of prints I throw one of my dud prints into the wash, to hang behind the odd one. This was how I discovered that "8x10" is not the same size to Foma, as it is to Ilford.

  5. #165
    Doc W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    139
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    I've been using screens for a while now with no issues, prints go on screen face up.

    I do not squeegee. I lean the dripping print on the screen at a steep, almost straight up angle for about 10 minutes to let most of the water run off. Then I put the screen in the rack and let it dry for about a day.

    I use a dry mount press to flatten the prints after they are already dry, by putting a print between two clean mat boards when the press is cool... Turning it on for a few minutes (just warm, not hot), then turning it off and leaving it for most of a day.

    The prints come out "almost" flat... I have seen some flatter prints come to me in the LFF print exchange. So I know there is a better way.
    Thanks Bill. I hear a lot of people using "face down on screen" approach with success so I don't know what happened in my case. Do you use hardening fixer?

    The prints in question were MGIV WT FB. I squeegeed the water off and lay them face down on the screen. This is the first time I have ever done that. I usually dry on screens, but not face down. They curl, of course, but I put them in a dry mount press which takes most of that out. I was just trying different methods to see if I could shorten the flattening time.

  6. #166
    Doc W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    139
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by sly View Post
    Back-to-back, emulsion side out. They don't stick together. RC prints stick together and never come apart.
    If I have an odd number of prints I throw one of my dud prints into the wash, to hang behind the odd one. This was how I discovered that "8x10" is not the same size to Foma, as it is to Ilford.
    Thanks. I will give it a whirl.

  7. #167
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,432
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc W View Post
    Thanks Bill. I hear a lot of people using "face down on screen" approach with success so I don't know what happened in my case. Do you use hardening fixer?

    The prints in question were MGIV WT FB. I squeegeed the water off and lay them face down on the screen. This is the first time I have ever done that. I usually dry on screens, but not face down. They curl, of course, but I put them in a dry mount press which takes most of that out. I was just trying different methods to see if I could shorten the flattening time.
    I don't add the hardener to my fixer. But the one time I did put some prints face down I saw a distinct screen pattern later when I toned them. I assume the contact with "anything" made the surface a little "harder" than the emulsion that didn't touch anything. My screens are not your typical window screen material. They are made from super lightweight mosquito net mesh leftover from a camping gear sewing project. Since I consider freedom from screen patterns one of the unique beautiful characteristics of analog photography, the result of even a hint of screen turned my stomach. So for me, face up is my strong recommendation.

  8. #168

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    KY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    20
    I didn't read the entire thread so I'm not sure this has been suggested. But after a litho course in college, I started using gum tape to tape down my FB prints onto a piece of plywood. I usually leave enough border so that the image isn't affected and the paper dries as flat as the board I'm using. Leave until air dry.

    Good quality gum tape has to be cut off though, while lower quality seems to just peel off of the border of the paper without remnants.

  9. #169
    GRHazelton's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Jonesboro, GA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    382
    Quote Originally Posted by Reinhold View Post
    It's been a long time since I used ferrotype plates, but here are some hints:
    The paper should be the "F" surface (Ferrotyping), for glossy surfaces.
    They've got to be sooper clean... try a no-scratch kitchen cleanser (Bon-Ami works very well)
    Waxing the surface helps... try a floor or car wax, well polished.
    The print should be given a final rinse in a rich, sudsy Foto-flo bath...
    Don't drain the print before laying it on the plate... no "dry" areas on the print... "slop" it onto the plate.
    Squeegee the print only after it's in full contact with the plate.
    Let the print "pop" off, don't try to coax it off too soon.
    If you like mirror smooth prints, it's hard to beat ferrotyping, even tho it's a hassle

    If you prefer the air dried surface, most folks dry their prints on screens & flatten 'em later (as Dennis says).
    I even have an old mangle (rotary clothes dryer) I got at a garage sale the works pretty good.
    A few years ago Salthill (remember them?) sold a good print dryer that I cloned.
    It works better than anyting else that I have tried in the last 60 years of makin' fotos...

    Take a look...
    http://www.classicbwphoto.com/Blog/A...A95E8D0C0.html

    Have fun.

    Reinhold
    Sounds like what I used to do in the late '50s when shooting for the high school paper. I used a brayer, rather than a squeegee. What a drag! And even still a lot of prints curled viciously. For my own use I shot glossy paper, but air dried it.

  10. #170

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,689
    ... anybody else old enough to remember those early black and white TV adds for clothes-ironing machines that had two heated rollers, and mom simply had to feed the clothes thru them? Those machine worked great... for putting lots of nicely pressed wrinkles all thru the fabric as it passed thru !



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin