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  1. #171
    Truzi's Avatar
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    I remember seeing it on a show about old commercials.
    Truzi

  2. #172

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Corrugated Board is correct; just in case somebody is
    interested in this superior method of achieving dry and
    flat in one move. I used blotter rolls many years ago
    when doing up to dozens of prints; Sorority and
    Fraternity work.

    Now days I use a flat version of the roll. I refer to it as
    a Corrugated Board Stack dryer as blotters are not used.
    Blotters are an absorbent material. Rather than that I use
    separator sheets of non-woven polyester, a non-absorbent
    hydorphobic material.

    Corrugated Board Blotter Roll and Stack dryers were quite
    popular years ago. Besides Kodak and their roll there were
    Salthill, Burk & James, and others who made available the
    stack type. The Luminos site had a page detailing the
    method for really FLAT and, I should add, DRY.

    A DIY Corrugated Stack dryer can be extremely inexpensive,
    light weight, compact, and have little to great capacity. The
    prints dry slowly, gently. Not for the impatient. Dan
    I know this is from five years ago, but could anyone chime in on this please? A very novice photographer/printer here and have been getting into enlarging as of late. Using Ilford MGFB Warmtone paper and renting the darkroom at one of the few remaining labs in Houston. The lady that works there has given me a crash course on printing and she mentioned getting a blotter book to take my prints home with me and not have to leave them there to dry then come back for them the next day.

    My question is, is this method using the corrugated board, then the non-woven polyester, a non-absorbent hydorphobic material (found at a local fabric store), then the print, then another later of the fabric, then another layer of the board? So a sandwich of sorts, similar to a blotter book but with different materials?

    What about multiple prints? Would one use the board>>fabric>>print>>fabric>>print>>fabric...etc> >board OR board>>fabric>>print>>board>>fabric>>print...etc?

    Thanks for any advice or help. Prints are being put wet on a glass pane, face up, then carefully squeegeed off. They would be put in this system fairly dry but still damp.

  3. #173

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    Quote Originally Posted by appletree View Post
    I know this is from five years ago, but could anyone chime in on this please? A very novice photographer/printer here and have been getting into enlarging as of late. Using Ilford MGFB Warmtone paper and renting the darkroom at one of the few remaining labs in Houston. The lady that works there has given me a crash course on printing and she mentioned getting a blotter book to take my prints home with me and not have to leave them there to dry then come back for them the next day.

    My question is, is this method using the corrugated board, then the non-woven polyester, a non-absorbent hydorphobic material (found at a local fabric store), then the print, then another later of the fabric, then another layer of the board? So a sandwich of sorts, similar to a blotter book but with different materials?

    What about multiple prints? Would one use the board>>fabric>>print>>fabric>>print>>fabric...etc> >board OR board>>fabric>>print>>board>>fabric>>print...etc?

    Thanks for any advice or help. Prints are being put wet on a glass pane, face up, then carefully squeegeed off. They would be put in this system fairly dry but still damp.
    I use old Kodak blotter rolls which is a roll of what you are describing. I have had better luck with them being very wet. I do squeegee them, but I don't let them dry out side at all. The nice thing with the roll is that they can be placed opposite the way they naturally want to curl. After 24hours I take them out and put them in a large book with weight on them for about a week. They are flat as a board at that point, and stay like that.

    Regards,
    Chris Maness

  4. #174

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    p.s. Since your system is already flat -- just leave them in until they are BONE dry. That would be probably a week depending on your local relative humidity. Squeegee, but don't let them dry or they will start to curl and cause warpage. You can stack as many as you want like you suggest. I would add weight to the sack as well.

    Regards,
    Chris Maness

  5. #175

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    Thanks for the information and details Chris, much appreciated.

    In your opinion should I attempt to make something similar to the Kodak blotter roll, with the corrugated board/fabric (a flat version, not rolled like Kodak's) or will a blotter book be sufficient. I am not too concerned with time to wait, just want it done properly and safely for the prints.

  6. #176

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    I have never done the cardboard sandwich as I had the blotter rolls laying around from a big darkroom donation. I am glad I hung on to them. Try the stack method. It is probably more straightforward. Remember to make sure the prints are 100% dry before you pull them or they will warp when they continue to dry.

    Regards,
    Chris Maness

  7. #177
    Derek Lofgreen's Avatar
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    To get them home from the darkroom use a bucket filled of water with a lid so it doesn't spill. Take them home and dry there.
    My Photography Site www.lofgreenimages.com and My Blog

  8. #178

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    Thanks for the advice gents.

    Derek,
    Care to explain what you mean? Any reason to not start the drying process there for a few minutes (squeegee in the darkroom), then put in a blotter book or cardboard sandwich or kodak blotter roll...then bring them home and let them dry for a few days? Once at home with the prints, is your drying method the same or one of the 10+ ways described throughout this thread?

    Time is not a priority. Safety for the photos, cleanliness, safe transportation, efficient workflow is though. It is why the sandwich or blotter method seemed the best of both worlds. Dries safely and once home can put some weight on it for a few days until fully dry and flat. No presses need, no heat, no iron, etc etc.

    Thanks again for the help.

  9. #179

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    I think Derek is assuming that your blotter stuff is at home. What you suggest is just fine. No need to keep it wet if you bring your blotter with you.

    Chris

  10. #180

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    Ahhh ok. Just making sure. I tend to make things more complicated than they need to be.

    Thanks again Chris. Have a nice day.



 

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