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  1. #181

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    I put the following simple system together. It was inspired by some of the suggestions above. I describe it in my blog linked below... It works well for 8x10 and I want to scale it up to 12x16 next.

    http://remorseblog.blogspot.co.uk/20...ng-method.html





    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  2. #182
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Back in the day we used a dilute solution of ethylene glycol (propylene glycol should also work and is nontoxic) as a brief final soak. The retained glycol is hygroscopic and the absorbed moisture helps keep the print flat. I can't speak to archival aspects, but those prints I can find seem fine. Of course, YMMV as always.

  3. #183

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    yes, and it works very well for things that aren't too big.
    the trick is to put them face to face and back to back
    (between masonite or clean boards)
    when the prints aren't tacky to the touch, so they won't glue themselves together.

    i use a nipping press and i use that from time to time,
    and i also have a book press i got from pottery barn ( yes its true! )
    and a small one i got from gaylord brothers.

    for big things, i back to back face to face them, and put them between sheets of matboard and under countertop.
    a bookbinder i worked with used to have heavy glass block ( ww2 navy warplane ) windshield. it worked great! he wasn't making photographs flat, but things he pasted/glued. kind of sort of the same thing...
    i forgot to mention you need
    to take them out before they are dry
    or they will stick together

  4. #184
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug_morse View Post
    I put the following simple system together.
    Nicely done!

  5. #185

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    How long do they take to dry this way, Doug? Thanks

    pentaxuser

  6. #186

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    Apr 2014
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    Hi Folks,


    Something to play with. About 40 years ago I was reading an article about how the old timers use to wax (paste) their prints to add some snap. Sounded interesting, but I didn't have any wax around, I did have some spray Pledge. I grabbed an old curled up print that was hanging around and sprayed it. Not only did the curl come out it started doing a reverse curl and came back almost perfectly flat, it did add some snap to the print. I'm not suggesting that this a good idea, but it was an interesting result. The print is still around and no worse for my test.

    I'm only starting to get back into the darkroom, so I'm not sure how much Pledge and/or paper has changed.


    Summer Regards
    Dick

  7. #187

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    I've found the best way of making FB prints flat is to dry them normally, and then place them face to face and put them between the pages of a large book. Weight the book and wait for a day or two, and voila! Flat prints.

    Primitive, but very effective.

  8. #188

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    Sep 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by moltogordo View Post
    I've found the best way of making FB prints flat is to dry them normally, and then place them face to face and put them between the pages of a large book. Weight the book and wait for a day or two, and voila! Flat prints.

    Primitive, but very effective.
    I have not had good luck with this technique in dry climate with thick papers. It works ok after a day in the Kodak blotter roll, but I put the prints in the blotter roll nearly sopping wet.

    Regards,
    Chris

  9. #189

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    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerSmithPhoto View Post
    ... For 100%, I leave the print in the press, turn it off and let it cool. It comes out flat as a floor.
    ...
    This is what I've been doing recently. I put the prints into the press cold and remove them cold. They are indeed flat. 5x7's only so far but it works.

    I've been printing in a university darkroom with screens but not had any issues. I wonder if it's the taughtness of the screen. The ones we are using are home made but the screen itself is not pulled tight. It is loose and sags about 1/4 to 1/2 inch. I place my FB prints in face down, no problem, and the seem to dry flatter than face up. I'm in Mid-Missouri though and the humidity is probably part of it.

  10. #190

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    Dancqu,

    Is the A flute you are using single face or double face? I notice large rolls of A flute single face are easy to find for relative reasonable cost, cut sheets of A flute double face not so much. What is your opinion about using the single face? Seems the moisture transfer would be better but I wonder about little ridges showing in the dried print. With that said my wife tells me interfacing comes in a number of weights, heavier might mitigate against the ridging.



 

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