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  1. #31
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    I tried it once with limited success for 16x20 where you hang two of them clipped back to back on a line. Worked OK but they were kinda "ripply".

    Anybody do that method?
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdunek View Post
    I use blotter rolls, but I don't think you can buy them
    any more. This is two sheets of blotter paper between
    sheets of soft corragated cardboard.
    Corrugated Board is correct; just in case somebody is
    interested in this superior method of achieving dry and
    flat in one move. I used blotter rolls many years ago
    when doing up to dozens of prints; Sorority and
    Fraternity work.

    Now days I use a flat version of the roll. I refer to it as
    a Corrugated Board Stack dryer as blotters are not used.
    Blotters are an absorbent material. Rather than that I use
    separator sheets of non-woven polyester, a non-absorbent
    hydorphobic material.

    Corrugated Board Blotter Roll and Stack dryers were quite
    popular years ago. Besides Kodak and their roll there were
    Salthill, Burk & James, and others who made available the
    stack type. The Luminos site had a page detailing the
    method for really FLAT and, I should add, DRY.

    A DIY Corrugated Stack dryer can be extremely inexpensive,
    light weight, compact, and have little to great capacity. The
    prints dry slowly, gently. Not for the impatient. Dan

  3. #33

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    Pre-Drying With a Sponge --- Squeegees?

    I don't know why pre-drying with a squeegee is so popular.
    Close quarters lead me to use a sponge. A sponge literally
    draws water from a surface unto itself; no water running
    here and there. Dryer prints to start.

    Tight quarters or spacious I think the sponge must have
    the squeegee beat. Has a careful comparison ever been
    made? I've two sizes of photo grade sponges and now
    tempted to buy a print squeegee. Tests of the two
    twixt each other should be of interest. Are there
    squeegees then there are squeegees?
    Recommendations? Dan

  4. #34

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    To rwyoung - I do the back to back hanging thing for all my prints (no matter what size), with all four corners clothespin clipped, the top 2 on the line. They dry flat enough, less so in dryer times of the year. I wash them back to back (but in separate compartments) in a Gravity Works washer, then I pull them out just an inch or so, line up the top corners with the separator in between, then pull both out together and hang together.
    I don't squeegee them (too much risk for me) and I suspect that the curling happens in the final stages of drying, so squeegeeing might help shorten the drying time, but I think relative humidity has more to do with the amount of curl, or "frilling" of the edges than anything.
    I have tried all of the suggested methods, and for years, blotters, with the corragated separators, which produced the flattest prints, by far, but I got tired of worrying about lint and accumulated contamination, careful as I am.
    Screens were ok, but often left a pattern, also need to be cleaned, and had curl.
    The back to back hanging is the simplest and works best for me.
    I just now did a search on Google for "photo blotters" and found this article - which aligns with most of my experiences - http://www.heylloyd.com/technicl/drying.htm.
    In any case, my experience is that no matter how flat they are (even if I flatten with a dry mount press after drying), if I store them in archival boxes, or old paper packets, the relative humidity the day I take them out to mount them is what really matters. Prints that were once perfectly flat might not be the day I take them out to frame them, so - I just hang them as described, and deal with whatever they are on the day I frame them.

  5. #35
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Decades ago, before RC paper and in a location where the best available paper was Mitsubishi Gekko, I dried prints between two sheets and under a blanket in a bed. This reduced, but didn't eliminate, the curl. Prints were then stored alternately face up and face down in tightly packed photo paper boxes. Complete flattening took a long time, but they are still flat.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    I think relative humidity has more to do with the amount
    of "frilling" of the edges than anything.
    I have tried all of the suggested methods, and for years, blotters,
    with the corragated separators, which produced the flattest prints,
    by far, but I got tired of worrying about lint and accumulated
    contamination, careful as I am.
    Your method of pulling and hanging wet prints reminds me
    of a wheat or rice glue method of mounting prints. A same
    but blank or waste print, also wet glued, is mounted on the
    back of the mount board. Two wets = no warp.

    To level the playing field, lint, dust, and chemical
    contamination are of concern what ever the method of
    drying. I think my adoption of a water repellent hydrophobic
    non-woven material an improvement over the usual absorbent
    blotters. I believe it leaves NO lint of itself and being water
    repellent it should need no more cleaning then screens of
    any same synthetic fabric. The non-woven polyester is
    called interfacing and is available from any well
    stocked fabric store. Very inexpensive. Dan

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by PVia View Post
    Has anyone ever tried a book press?
    yes, and it works very well for things that aren't too big.
    the trick is to put them face to face and back to back
    (between masonite or clean boards)
    when the prints aren't tacky to the touch, so they won't glue themselves together.

    i use a nipping press and i use that from time to time,
    and i also have a book press i got from pottery barn ( yes its true! )
    and a small one i got from gaylord brothers.

    for big things, i back to back face to face them, and put them between sheets of matboard and under countertop.
    a bookbinder i worked with used to have heavy glass block ( ww2 navy warplane ) windshield. it worked great! he wasn't making photographs flat, but things he pasted/glued. kind of sort of the same thing...
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  8. #38

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    Dan - I realized I didn't read your post carefully. What is the "water repellent hydrophobic non-woven material" called and where do you get it? (and where do you get the corrugated separators?) Sounds like this method is worth a try, as I am not the impatient type.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    Dan - I realized I didn't read your post carefully.
    What is the "water repellent hydrophobic non-woven
    material" called and where do you get it? (and where
    do you get the corrugated separators?) Sounds like this
    method is worth a try, as I am not the impatient type.
    I've not been very specific. The non-woven hydrophobic
    material is of polyester and is available at fabric outlets.
    I've tested at least four of these thin sheet materials. The
    most recent has some body making it easy to handle. It
    also is calendered so has none of the fuzz some do.
    I can recommend it but will need to pin down it's
    identity. Some thing I forgot to do my last
    visit to the store.

    The corrugated board separators came from Forestry
    Suppliers. A dozen, 12 x 18 inch, cost under $10 + S&H.
    A search of Google for, plant presses, or, corrugated
    ventilators, will bring up quite a few sources.

    I've been investigating the corrugated board supplies.
    I'm looking for a source of the same board but in
    larger size. The above size is good at most to
    11 x ?. I believe that specific board is water
    resistant; it resists deformation.

    I'll PM with in the next few days with that polyesters
    exact identity. If you drop by a fabric shop ask to
    see their interfacing. If you've a mind, order
    a dozen of those ventilator boards. Dan

  10. #40

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    Dan,

    Do us all a favor and post the specifics here rather than in a PM. I'm interested. Also, are the corrugated boards simply cardboard or are they something more sophisticated?

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