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  1. #41
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Corrugated fiberboard sources:
    Your local appliance dealer has refrigerator and dishwasher size cartons for free. Cut them into any size you want, just make sure that the corrugations run parallel to your airflow so the moisture can be easily blown out of the stack. It's usually a heavier grade of paper, so they'll last a loooong time. Don't worry about water resistant board, you'll remove all standing water off of the print before putting them into your drier anyway.

    Ask any dressmaker about interfacing, and they'll use the phrase "Pellon". Read about it here:
    http://www.pellonideas.com/content/view/14/30/

    For non-woven materials, DuPont's "Tyvek" is very good. Read about it here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyvek
    It's available in thicker 18lb sheets (thicker = better), 25 sheets, 17 x 22", $38.99 here:
    http://www.allweatherblueprints.com/...-18172225.html

    Another non-woven olefin product is "Reemay".
    Gaylord promotes it as "an interleaving material when drying wet photographs" here:
    http://www.gaylordmart.com/adblock.a...8611A8DA39F707

    Personally. I find acid free blotters work very well in my homemade drier discussed here:
    http://www.classicbwphoto.com/Blog/A...A95E8D0C0.html

    Conservation grade blotter papers are also from Gaylord here:
    http://www.gaylordmart.com/listing.asp?H=3&PCI=128007

    If you want to go First Cabin, you can get archival corrugated board from Gaylord here:
    http://www.gaylordmart.com/listing.asp?H=3&PCI=128003

    That oughta get you started.
    Have fun.

    Reinhold
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dry 1.jpg  

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmal View Post
    Dan, Do us all a favor and post the specifics here rather than in a PM.
    I'm interested. Also, are the corrugated boards simply cardboard or
    are they something more sophisticated?
    Cardboard is nothing more than a heavy, thick paper.
    Search Google for, corrugated board . Wikipedia has
    a good amount of information and a very good
    illustration. Scroll down some then magnify.

    Note the choice of thickness. The A flute I've been
    using has the greatest of air passage twixt the two
    face sheets. Likely the reason it is termed A flute
    Ventilator. C flute has nearly as much. B flute
    by comparison has constricted air passage.

    Any good quality A or C flute corrugated will do.
    I think the board I've been using is water resistant.
    Although the prints are no more than very damp
    when placed on the drying sheets, the humidity
    must be close to 100% while the prints are
    drying; high enough to warp paper.

    Likely I'll need to Email a source or two of those
    VENTILATORS in order to know their source.
    I'd like to see some larger sheet sizes
    made available. Dan

  3. #43

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    Pakosol used to sell a chemical treatment, and while it would make it ore flat than not using it, having a dry mount press is the easiest.

    I have a 16x20 that I am not using, should you want to discuss acquiring it.

  4. #44

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    Dan and Reinhold - thanks for your most helpful responses. One more question: if you are using a good facing material (as you describe) do you have to worry about the acid content of the corrugated material?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    To rwyoung - I do the back to back hanging thing for all my prints (no matter what size), with all four corners clothespin clipped, the top 2 on the line. They dry flat enough, less so in dryer times of the year. I wash them back to back (but in separate compartments) in a Gravity Works washer, then I pull them out just an inch or so, line up the top corners with the separator in between, then pull both out together and hang together.
    I don't squeegee them (too much risk for me) and I suspect that the curling happens in the final stages of drying, so squeegeeing might help shorten the drying time, but I think relative humidity has more to do with the amount of curl, or "frilling" of the edges than anything.
    I have tried all of the suggested methods, and for years, blotters, with the corragated separators, which produced the flattest prints, by far, but I got tired of worrying about lint and accumulated contamination, careful as I am.
    Screens were ok, but often left a pattern, also need to be cleaned, and had curl.
    The back to back hanging is the simplest and works best for me.
    I just now did a search on Google for "photo blotters" and found this article - which aligns with most of my experiences - http://www.heylloyd.com/technicl/drying.htm.
    In any case, my experience is that no matter how flat they are (even if I flatten with a dry mount press after drying), if I store them in archival boxes, or old paper packets, the relative humidity the day I take them out to mount them is what really matters. Prints that were once perfectly flat might not be the day I take them out to frame them, so - I just hang them as described, and deal with whatever they are on the day I frame them.
    FWIW, I have had exactly the same experience and reached the same conclusions.
    Jerold Harter MD

  6. #46
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    George,

    I use paper blotters, and Dan uses a synthetic non-woven, but we both remove all standing water off of the print before putting them into the drier. I'll let Dan chime in, but I'm totally confident that acid bleed is not a problem if your prints are truly free of surface water. The interleaving should not feel wet. Remember, your prints are in the drier for only a few hours, at most.

    My blotters are (I'm guesing) about 10 years old, and have dried (I'm guessing) about 300 prints. The blotters are still in good shape, no stains (except a few drops where I first discovered the necessity of removing all surface water). The corrugated looks about the same as when I started, no water marks, no puckering, just the typical "old corrugated carton" look. I know that some folks might be nervous about using such unrefined stuff, so I included a link to Conservation grade acid free board for their benefit.

    Dan; your comments...?

    Cheers

    Reinhold

  7. #47

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    Reinhold - thanks for your last post. My workflow when using either blotters or screens, many years ago, was to hang them back to back first, until they were nearing the point of beginning to dry (how do I describe that - still moist but not dripping), then put them into the screens or blotters. This is what I would do if going back to blotters. I'll have to think about this. Last night I found that I actually still have an unopened, virgin set of Kodak blotters big enough for 16x20 that I may use.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    Dan and Reinhold - thanks for your most helpful responses.
    One more question: if you are using a good facing material
    (as you describe) do you have to worry about the acid
    content of the corrugated material?
    By "facing material" you mean the polyester separator
    sheets? I can't see that an issue. Pre dried by sponge or
    squeegee and placed upon those non-wetting separators
    precludes contact with the corrugated board. No more
    than water vapor transfers from the prints, through
    the boards facing's, and out of the stack. A print
    layer with top and bottom separators. Dan

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reinhold View Post
    "I use paper blotters, and Dan uses a synthetic non-woven,
    but we both remove all standing water off of the print before
    putting them into the drier. I'll let Dan chime in, but I'm totally
    confident that acid bleed is not a problem if your prints are truly
    free of surface water. The interleaving should not feel wet.
    Remember, your prints are in the drier for only a few
    hours, at most.
    A comment:

    I can believe that there is some bleed from print to paper.
    The stack is weighted on top and contact is intimate. Perhaps
    that is as it should be. Paper separators as with many other
    materials used in darkroom work date from ages ago. The
    paper in direct contact and under pressure will absorb
    moisture and direct it to the two face sheets of the
    bottom and top corrugated boards.

    I couldn't say how much of the very little chemistry
    left in the paper is transferred. Cellulose is hydrophilic
    so making it more believable that some transfer occurs.
    So much for transfer from paper to separator. The print
    is cleaner for the transfer and if there is no reversal of
    transfer, as may be the case, then no problem.

    There is another matter to be considered in the choice
    of separator material and that is permeability. Will the
    material allow for the free passage of water vapor? As
    I see it the corrugated board's facing sheets present
    the greatest barrier. All of the non-woven very
    hydrophobic separator materials I've tested
    are extremely permeable. Dan

  10. #50
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    I tried the method of laying the print on a piece of glass and taping the edges down. I used two prints I didn't care for, taking them out of the water I didn't squeegee them but just taped them to the glass and let them dry 5 hours or so. They looked great, flat, just like they were dry mounted; that is until I cut them loose, I couldn't get them off the glass. Both prints were ruined. I'm trying one now that I squeegeed before taping to the glass.

    If I can't get this method to work I think I'll adopt it when it comes time to mount the print but instead of tape I'll just use photo corners.



 

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