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  1. #11

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    I agree, it's still good outdoors. I went through a box or two and I recall shooting it all outdoors or with available light.

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You can use TXP outdoors, but you've got to be a bit more careful to give sufficient exposure to get the shadows off the toe of the film curve (i.e., to get good shadow separation), and to control development, particularly when you've got very contrasty lighting, or the highlights will be difficult to print. I use it all the time.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13

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    Much to think about. It's too cold to go out and take pictures so I guess I'll sit in front of the fire and think.

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    John, if I were you I'd buy a roll of each and shoot an identical scene with both rolls, develop them, and see if there is enough between them, in practical matters and for your purposes, to worry about.

    The 320 isn't as bad as you might think. It's great film, and you'll enjoy both if you learn how to use them to your liking.

    Don't think. Do! And take notes.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15
    K-G
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    Another important thing is that the TXP 320 is, as far as I know, the only
    black and white film available in 220 size. I have used it during the last
    30 years for general purpose, and as long as you have a good lighting situation it gives excelent results. I normaly develop it with D-76 or
    HC-110 and they both work fine. If you develop in tanks with film spirals ( such as Paterson ) , be carefull so the spirals are bone dry when you load the film. The 220 film is more sensitive to jaming when you load it as it is
    twice the length of a 120-film. With a 220-back for , in my case , the Hasselblad it is a great feeling to be able to shoot a rapid sequence of
    24 2 1/4 square frames without having to reload.
    Give it a try. It is worth it !
    Godd Luck !

    Karl-Gustaf

  6. #16
    viridari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip P. Dimor View Post
    I was always under the impression that the 320 Tri-X was more suited for controlled lighting within studios. There's a pdf on the Kodak site somewhere, or there should be.
    I really like using it outdoors when it is a bit overcast out.


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