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  1. #1

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    TRI-X 400, 320 TXP, and Arista 400

    I've seen statements that Arista 400 from Freestyle is TRI-X made in the US by Kodak. If that is the case, is it TRI-X 400 or 320 TXP? In addition, what is the difference between TRI-X 400 and 320 TXP, technically and practically?

  2. #2
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    It is the 400. The 320 version is not available in 35mm.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

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  3. #3

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    TXP 320 is a different film than TX400 (they really should have different names); they have different looks and the TXP 320 has a retouching surface. TXP320 is meant for studio use, but many folks use it for other uses.

  4. #4

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    You need to be more specific. Just saying "Arista 400" refers not just to one film, but possibly four (or more?) different films from different makers.

  5. #5

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    Arista Premium is rumored to be Tri-X. Arista.EDU Ultra is Fomapan.
    Frank Schifano

  6. #6

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    OK. For 4X5 Tri-X, my only choice is ISO 320. For 35mm Tri-X, my only choice is ISO 400, whether from Kodak or Arista Premium. Then, for Tri-X 120 I have a choice of 320 or 400. What would lead me to choose one over the other. I use 120 in a roll film back on my field camera and in an elderly twin lens reflex.

  7. #7

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    I was always under the impression that the 320 Tri-X was more suited for controlled lighting within studios. There's a pdf on the Kodak site somewhere, or there should be.

  8. #8
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Tri-X 320 vs 400

    You can find Kodak's Tech Pub at:

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4017/f4017.pdf

    It contains the characteristic curves for both films in 120 that I've attached here. From this you can deduce that the 400 version has a straighter response across the grayscale than the 320. The 320 has more of a curve with less separation in both shadow and highlight detail.

    If you shoot the 320 slightly overexposed, and use a compensating developer, like Rodinal or Pyrocat, you can get similar results to the 400.

    I hope that helps.

    - Thomas
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tri-X-320-400.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  9. #9
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Irvine View Post
    OK. For 4X5 Tri-X, my only choice is ISO 320. For 35mm Tri-X, my only choice is ISO 400, whether from Kodak or Arista Premium. Then, for Tri-X 120 I have a choice of 320 or 400. What would lead me to choose one over the other. I use 120 in a roll film back on my field camera and in an elderly twin lens reflex.
    *****
    My understanding is that TXP has a different curve, with a longer toe than TX.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  10. #10

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    Yes, that's true. Works well in low flare situations where the lighting can be carefully controlled. But don't let that stop you from trying it outdoors. When I bought my Graphic View 4x5, the seller included about 75 sheets of Tri-X 320 with it. It was the only film I had for the camera when it arrived and naturally, I couldn't wait to try it out. It worked well, very well in fact.
    Frank Schifano

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