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  1. #1

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    Process for Ilford Delta 100 as Slide Film

    Recently, I've been shooting 120 Format Ilford Delta 100 B&W film and want to develop it as (positive) slide film so that it will scan more easily and with better results. One option, I know, is the Dr5 Chrome lab, but I wonder how hard this would be to do myself. If it's as easy as processing negatives in D76, I'm game to try it. If the process is more sensitive, in either time or temperature, I'm less interested. Anyone know how it is done and with what chemicals? (I did search for "b&w slide" but got no direct results.) Thanks.

  2. #2

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    Have a look at Ilford's website and search for reversal processing. They have a PDF that describes the process. Some of the chemicals used are home brews, but the most tough thing is to unspool the film, expose it for about a minute in light, then treat it some more in chemicals. Yes, it's wet film! IDK if D100 is a good film for that purpose, but they do propose some films.

    OTOH, there are other methods that produce positives, that don't require reexposure. IIRC, a stanus salt bath is used (Stanus Chloride?), but I don't really know. Nor do I know about the quality of the positives obtained. Lastly, have a look at the forum's articles. There are some published formulae there.

  3. #3

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    There are at least three different B&W reversal kits available, though formulae are also available to mix the stock up yourself. Not sure where you are in the world but have a look at London's mighty Silverprint's website for the ones they sell. (http://www.silverprint.co.uk/Product....asp?PrGrp=506) They also have pdf's on the site to download with more info. But do you really need to produce slides for better scans? A BW neg scanned in 16 bit grayscale should, depending on the quality of scanner used, give excellent results. (Yes I do hear the crowds outside shouting 'Hybrid Hybrid') Also, if you go straight to transparency, there's no chance of going in the darkroom to get a wonderful print!
    Last edited by Mike Crawford; 01-20-2009 at 02:30 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: more info added

  4. #4
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    Will making it a positive make it better to scan? You lose some latitude in the conversion. That limits your ability to do image manipulation or correction digitally, and as Mike mentioned, eliminates the possibility of traditional, archival printing.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    Will making it a positive make it better to scan? You lose some latitude in the conversion. That limits your ability to do image manipulation or correction digitally, and as Mike mentioned, eliminates the possibility of traditional, archival printing.
    Very good point. Transparency latitude is considered not as good as from negative so any shadow (or highlight) detail lost in the reversal process may not be found again.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    Will making it a positive make it better to scan? You lose some latitude in the conversion. That limits your ability to do image manipulation or correction digitally, and as Mike mentioned, eliminates the possibility of traditional, archival printing.
    Actually the slide is finer-grained than the negative, and it has less silver in it thus scans pretty well.

    On the other hand you can always make beautiful prints by scanning slides.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobalobo View Post
    Recently, I've been shooting 120 Format Ilford Delta 100 B&W film and want to develop it as (positive) slide film so that it will scan more easily and with better results. One option, I know, is the Dr5 Chrome lab, but I wonder how hard this would be to do myself. If it's as easy as processing negatives in D76, I'm game to try it. If the process is more sensitive, in either time or temperature, I'm less interested. Anyone know how it is done and with what chemicals? (I did search for "b&w slide" but got no direct results.) Thanks.
    It's not that difficult as it seems. The important things I feel is use 18°C as the tempereture, keep ALL baths (including the washings) at the same very temperature (-+ 0,5°C, as in E6 process) to minimize emulsion damage, use permanganate based bleaches.

    That's pretty all to it.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobalobo View Post
    Recently, I've been shooting 120 Format Ilford Delta 100 B&W film and want to develop it as (positive) slide film so that it will scan more easily and with better results. One option, I know, is the Dr5 Chrome lab, but I wonder how hard this would be to do myself. If it's as easy as processing negatives in D76, I'm game to try it. If the process is more sensitive, in either time or temperature, I'm less interested. Anyone know how it is done and with what chemicals? (I did search for "b&w slide" but got no direct results.) Thanks.
    Search for "B&W reversal processing" and you'll get a whole heap of links with DIY formulae and other options. It is definitely do-able at home, but requires experimentation and is NOT as easy as a B&W negative process.

  9. #9

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    Thanks to all. Not something I'm going to try on my own--could do it, I think, but don't have the time or patience at the moment; the responses helped me realize this.

  10. #10

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    I fancied having a go at reversal processing, but didn't fancy the idea of mixing my own chemicals. Reading some of the on-line guides also left me more than a little apprehensive about the idea. In the end I gave the "Speedibrews" "Celer Reverser" B&W reversal kit a go, and can certainly recommend it. The chemicals came with clear, easy to follow instructions and times for a whole range of different films. The chemicals come in seperate sealed bags ready weighed out, all you need to do is empty each bag of chemicals into the stated volume of water - then stir!

    You gain a 2 stop speed increase on the film's box speed, so the FP4 I initially used needed to be rated at 400asa (ok, 500 to be picky!). I followed the instructions to the letter and had no problems. The re-exposure stage is done with the film still on the reel in a tank of water (to avoid water droplets acting as mini-lenses). Despite being one of my prior concerns with the reversal process, the fogging was dead easy.

    The instructions do warn that the process will leave the emulsion a little fragile, and recommends not using a film squeegee. After scratching negatives with various squeegee tools, I now only ever 'squeegee' my negs between two fingers (my own), so carefully did the same again and didn't have any problems.

    The next time I tried the reversal process I used PanF. Unfortunately that emulsion seems a little more sensitive to the chemicals, as flakes of emulsion fell off during (gentle) rinse cycles at the end of the process! Clearly some films work better than others!

    The instructions do warn that some experimentation regarding times might be necessary to reach personal 'ideal' results, but they include pointers on what times to vary to acheive different effects. Certainly the stated times for the FP4 I used turned out to give perfect exposure.

    I bought the kit from "RK Photographic" as they don't have the £25 minimum order charge policy that Silverprint operates - interestingly the receipt was posted to me from RK, but the chemical kit was shipped to me by Silverprint! Lol.


    As usual, I have no connection with the companies concerned other than as a satisfied customer.

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