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  1. #11
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I've only worried about the developer. The temperature difference is not going to cause reticulation. I tend to give the fix an extra minute or two if I'm working in the winter when my chemicals are a bit cold. When printing, I don't worry about it at all....except for lith where I heat the developer with a water bath jsut to keep the development times reasonable.

  2. #12

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    I use Dow quart size (7X8 inch) heavy duty Ziploc freezer storage bags filled with the hottest tap water available. Dragging the bag back and forth through the in tray developer raises the temperature pretty darn quickly. In hot weather the bags can be filled with ice cubes to lower the temperature. Makes mid session temp adjustments very easy.

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Heating the chemicals up from storage to use, I use a water bath where I immerse the container of chemicals into a larger container with hot water.

    For keeping them warm in the darkroom, I use an electric oil radiator (like a regular radiator, but it's not centrally piped in, but has circulating hot oil inside). I place this directly under the developer tray, which rests on a wire shelf. Even in the coldest of winter weather it keeps the developer temperature above 70*F. My stop bath and fixer is a little colder than that, but it works without issues.

    I don't have running water in my darkroom, so I have to resort to this. Sometimes I use a bottle of hot water, cap it up, and lay it in the developer tray for a while and slosh the developer around.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    When in the UK, just a washing up bowl of water & a kettle if I need rapid hot water. It is important with negatives to keep the dev, stop, fix & wash within 1 or 2 degrees C.

    Here in Turkey I usually use ice cubes in the hottest spells to keep solution temperatures stable.

    Ian

  5. #15
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Rubylith to the rescue

    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    I use an old microwave from a garage sale, $5.00. Just make sure that you don't have any paper hanging around while it's running; they put light when they're on!
    Mine has a 'flap' of rubylith a bit bigger than the lamp window taped over the lamp port. The tape adhesive that holds it in place over time gets very brown, but since it is my darkroom microwave, who cares. Take care if your unit does not have a window, and instaed the lamp light comes in though the ventilation port.

    My oven has a glowing blue display for the time, power etc above the key pad. I don't set the clock in it, so it usually only displays two dots on power up. I have a mostly black peice of 35mm film leader taped over this front panel display to act as a neutral density filter, to keep it from glowig too brightly when I punch in times to use the oven.

    I have a piece of gaffer tape stuck over the 10 sec button, since that seems to be about the right amount of heat to dry out test strips when testing for dry down without having the emulsion bubble off and the thing catch fire ( I am serious- thats what hitting the 1 min button by accident and then letting the mind wander can do). Now I can start the thing for the right amount of time by feel, without having to look at the display when doing test strips.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #16

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  7. #17

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    The simplest way of all is a JOBO waterbath warming unit-if you can find one
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  8. #18
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    I have never found a good way of heating up cool chemicals – each method has its own drawbacks.

    I use a warm water tempering bath and allow plenty of time for them to come slowly up to temperature.

    All the chemicals need to be with +/- 2C of the previous bath to avoid reticulation problems (emulsion crazing)

    Preparation is key to ensuring a good repeatable process – so it is worth spending the time to getting the temperatures right.

    I tend to process my films in reasonably large batches, as the set up time is almost the same for one roll of film as it is for twenty.

    Good luck

    Martin

  9. #19

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    Running hot water will warm the chemicals faster than a water bath of the same temperature because of convection.

    I have developed film many times when the temperature differences between chemical baths were much greater than 2C and never had reticulation problems with modern films (where modern = from the last 20 years or so).

  10. #20
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherryrig View Post
    Right at the moment when I'm developing I pour out my fix which is already mixed up, and then I add some hot water to a little tray, to help to get it up to the right temp. However this sometimes takes quite a while to get it to around 20C. So by the time I've loaded the film onto the reel and then used the developer it's about time. However it takes a lot of prep time.

    Therefore I was wondering what the best way is to get chems to the right temp. Is there like a tray heater thing you can get or something??

    I'm not sure as I'm quite new to developing really

    Cheers
    Ideally, get yourself an old aquarium with a heater, wrap the outside with styrofoam insulation, make a tight fitting insulated lid, put in enough water for your bottles of chems, set the heater to 20℃ and keep the chemical bottles in there. Your chemicals will always be at 20℃ when you start, and because it's insulated, the cost of running the heater 7/24 should be quite reasonable.

    Now invest is a good heater for your darkroom, one of the oil filled ones should work nicely, to get the darkroom warmer. The opposite is also true, if your darkroom is always way too warm, then add a portable A/C unit to the darkroom.

    if you have forced air central heating/air conditioning, and the darkroom is far from the furnace then sometimes a booster in-line fan will help, add an additional filter to the supply as well, make sure the darkroom does NOT have a cold air return, you want the darkroom to vent to the outside, although if you have a heat recovery ventilator (some modern construction) then the darkroom vent should feed to output side of the HRV, to recover the heat from the darkroom. You might also want to add some sheet Styrofoam insulation to the interior of the exterior wall of the darkroom, so that it runs a few degrees warmer.

    I am amazed at some darkrooms, they are cold, dusty, full of gagging fumes, and the home to the only 8 track mono boom box still in existence (evidenced by the gaffer tape holding it together). The darkroom should be warm, clean, well vented and have a good sound system, it should be a place of comfort and refuge, where you create your "art", even if that art is a photo of the cat and a piece of string.....
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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