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  1. #11

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    John, it sounds like you cut the film loose from the cartridge from the very beginning. I always leave my 35 mm in the cartridge (you can get the lead out pretty easily with that special gadget or a strip of old negative with a piece of double sided tape) and pull out as much of the film as I need as I go along. The weight of the cartridge more or less keeps the film straight. As soon as I get to the end of the film (the cartridge almost touches the Patterson reel), I then cut loose the cartridge and load the last little bit of film, which is indeed pretty curly! I have never had any problems with scratching or otherwise damaging the film.

    Hope this helps.
    Good luck.
    Anne Marieke

  2. #12
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I just returned from a 45 minute session in my darkroom, where, while waiting for newly mixed chemicals to temperature stabilize, I retrieved my Patterson tank, and a sample roll of blank 35mm film (Uh ... I made a blank film expressly so I could practice loading tanks ... anyone buy that??).

    I really cannot see a problem from the curling of the film. One thing I have noticed is that the initial threading of the film under the "balls and ramps" goes more easily if the film is *lifted* gently to the outside of the tank at the beginning. I usually place my thumbs over the ramp tabs on the outside of the reel to "reinforce" the security ... then do the "cranking" bit... one half of the reels clockwise, then reverse ... and ... very little trouble.

    Even if I try to "push" the film onto the tank, I only put pressure on the very edges, to create a "stiffening arch"... which also works well.

    I really do not know what to say ... I haven't seen the necessity for touching the emulsion.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  3. #13
    dr bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    ....some deleting....

    Even if I try to "push" the film onto the tank, I only put pressure on the very edges, to create a "stiffening arch"... which also works well.

    I really do not know what to say ... I haven't seen the necessity for touching the emulsion.
    Nor do I. I have had my problems loading reels (like the time the whole mess "popped" out of the reel and ended up on the floor). I employ Ed's methods for the plastic reels. However I find the metal reels more to my liking for both 120 and 35mm films.

    One trick I use with the 35mm is to square up the leader end and insert the end under the clip (metal reels) with lights on. There is always sufficient leader and handling the film is minimized. I have not opened a cassette in years, but then I do so little 35mm too.

    For 120, I find it quite useful to snip the corners of the leading edge (45 degrees) which allows much easier loading on metal and plastic reels. And like Ed, I hardly ever have to touch the emulsion. If the film is not perfectly centered, a little backward tug usually aligns it.

    Truly, dr bob.

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