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  1. #11
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    One thing that works effectively (I do this periodically, just in case) is to disassemble the reel and scrub the tracks with .., a tooth brush. Hmm... I wonder ... possibly tooth paste would be a suitable mild abrasive...?
    I'd mark that toothbrush _very_ clearly if I were you . Although you'd probably notice an peculiar taste fairly quicky :Sick: .

    When I started using my Jobo for B&W recently I checked out the FAQ on their site. I saw the "Why shouldn't I use wetting agents in my tank?" question and assumed that it must have to do with foaming. Later, when I actually read the answer it mentioned the "gunking up" of the tanks, even stainless ones. Frankly, after decades of working in dozens of commercial darkrooms, I've never noticed a problem but I'm new to using plastic tanks and reels and I'd just as soon 'de-reel' my film before wetting it anyway.

    I use Kodak Photoflo for the sole reason that I haven't had a problem with it so far. After hanging the film, I remove the excess by running a folded piece of photo-wipe down each side of the film. I've been happy with the lack of water marks and haven't seen any bad effects, at least for many years.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #12
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I have used photoflo in my tank, but not with the lid on! No photoflo has ever touched the lid, and that's where my problem is.

    Oh, and the toothbrush in question is kept downstairs in my darkroom, and is very scary looking. Not gonna be confused for a viable one.

  3. #13
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Cheryl ya just gotta quit letting your kids use your tanks as jello molds LOL.
    www.ericrose.com
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    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

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  4. #14
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    Funny. I've been using the same Jobo daylight plastic tank for decades, and never had anything to clean (besides standard wash).
    But I've never used photoflo, also.

    But Cheryl states the lid haven't seen photoflo..

    ??

    Jorge O

  5. #15
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I just tossed out that Photoflo idea because I saw it on the Jobo site. I, and apparently no one else, have ever seemed to have actually seen this problem in real life. It kind of sidetracked the discussion from Cheryl's real problem.

    Kodak made a system cleaner for commercial labs. Nasty Yellow stuff but it worked good. There are probably others and maybe even household solutions. Since you can't get to it to scrub it, I suppose that you will need to soak and rinse the lid, maybe repeatedly.

    One nice thing about the Jobo lids that I use is that you can disassemble the light trap and reach every bit of it.

    Good Luck and if you find something that works, be sure to let us know.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #16
    Aggie's Avatar
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  7. #17
    lee
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    that yellow nasty stuff Kodak had was somesort of potatisum fericynde (sp?) and fixer. Generally it is very close to Farmers Reducer. It will eat (bleach) the silver stains. I have used it to clean trays. The really nasty stuff is called Systems cleaner. I am not sure that they sell this anymore.

    lee\c

  8. #18
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Yeah Lee, Black silver stains in trays would disappear instantly on contact with that stuff. Farmer's reducer makes sense.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  9. #19
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Hmm. Ok, I can try Coke (or at least Dr. Pepper) and I have some farmer's, too. Thanks for the suggestions.

  10. #20
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    I use a sink/tank cleaner called PhotoFinish, made by the same guys qho make PEC-12 www.photosol.com. My tanks are clean, but there's gunk down the center of the inside of the spindle. If hot water and photofinish doesn't dissolve it, I feel confident that fixer won't dissolve it either. Kind of like curing a frypan

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