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  1. #1

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    Just interested if anyone might have a comprehensive list of all panchromatic films available in 8X10" size? Or tell me what you know is available in this size.

  2. #2
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Here's what I know Sandy.

    J&C Classic 200, Classic 400
    Bergger BFP-200

    Ilford HP-5 400, FP-4 125, Delta Pro 100

    Kodak Tri-X TXP 320, T-Max 100, T-Max 400, Tech Pan (hugely expensive), Ektapan 100, Plus-X Pan 125

    Efke PL-25, PL-100

    Ironically, Kodak has the largest selection but seems to be pricing themselves out of the market.

  3. #3

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    The selection really depends on what your intentions are. Are you looking for 8x10 film for enlarging negatives for contact printing processes, or are you looking to shoot directly onto the sheet film with an 8x10 camera? Your options can vary widely from one intended purpose to another. If you are looking to make enlargements of negatives for alt processes and cost is a factor, I might have some good suggestions (I fall under this category, too).

  4. #4

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    Aurore, I would like to hear your suggestions on film for making enlargements of negatives for alt processess. Have played around with Zia types from B&S, but only with 4x5 negs. Not sure I really understand all of the steps going from neg/pos/neg and really don't want to waste film. Would like to try some contact prints with AZO I keep reading so much about hear as well....
    Mike C

    Rambles

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Alas, you can cross Ektapan and Plus-X Pan off the list. Both have been discontinued, but you can find some around if you hunt for it.

    Here's a full list of J&C films:

    http://jandcphotography.com/Page8x10.htm

    There are also the Arista films from Freestyle, said to be FP4 and HP5.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6

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    Whew, that JandC and Efke film ain't cheap!! Ok, well, I suppose it's average price, isn't it? Not that I'd pay that much...

    Yes, Arista 125 is FP4 and Arista 400 is HP5. I use Arista 400 for my pinhole camera... same film, lower price. Some say it's film from the 'end' of each mass produced roll of Ilford, whatever that means in terms of quality.

    Mike - Originally I used Arista OrthoLith (which is cheap!) because during the summer class (photo 101) I took at the community college before building my darkroom I learned of a little secret... the lost and found box. Rummaged through and found the OrthoLith, and the professor said I could have it. I thought it was paper, and was wrong. But it came in handy when I discovered Cyanotypes a year later. I do a test strip at f/8 (I think... my darkroom has been packed up a few months now, for an impending move) for maybe 5 or 10 sec intervals. Speed is ISO 4 if that helps. I develop in Dektol (isn't that handy?) at a high dilution... 1:20 or so. The negatives turn out fine for my personal tastes as far as contrast goes. And it's helpful that the negatives can be processed under red safelight. There's a fair amount of info on this procedure to be had via Google.com. Arista is available at www.freestylephoto.biz ( http://www.freestylephoto.biz/sc_pro...d=406&pid=1190 ) $45 for 100 sheets of 8x10.

    When my darkroom is back up and running I plan on experimenting with two different procedures. First is direct positive using negative film (again, Arista Ortholith). This is accomplished by exposing, flashing, and then developing normally, bleaching without fixing, then re-exposing the remaining silver to room light to get a negative image. It requires Sulfuric Acid (easily obtainable and cheap - battery acid or pool acid), Sodium Sulfite (common developer chemical... probably can be had locally in a decent sized city... look for chemical suppliers), and Potassium Dichromate (used in alt. processes like gum bichromate, same as the last, or go to photographer's formulary website or other online supplier). Safety procedures should be strictly followed, btw... hospital-type respirator, goggles, gloves, good ventilation. Seems like this method may or may not be worth the extra work, but chances are it's pretty simple so long as you're organized and have a fair amount of negatives to make at one time. Saves film, as there is no need for an interpositive.

    Other option is continuous tone dupe film from Photowarehouse.biz for making direct negatives with standard processing. They seem to have the lowest prices for such film. $25 for 25 8x10 sheets or $82 for 100. http://photowarehouse.biz/pdf/photo.pdf - 4th page, middle left.

    So, this is all I have so far, and I hope it's useful. Check the thread under Alt Process forum titled 'Internegative Guide Wanted'. I imagine each process is pretty equal in comparing price/work involved. It's probably more a matter of what each individual is comfortable with. I will probably end up leaving myself two or three options... for days when I'm lazy/can't think straight and days when I'm up for a challenge. Probably will see slightly different negatives with each option also, which may lend themselves to certain processes.

    I will start experimenting soon (hopefully!) and will update you if you like.

    Aurore

  7. #7

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    My interest is in knowing what films are available in 8X10" size for making in-camera negatives for contact printing, not for making enlarged negatives.

    Which leads me to a second question. Is there any reason to use a film of less than ISO/ASA 100 for contact printing? Based on my own experience I would say no, but perhaps someone has knowledge of a specific situation in which a very slow speed film gave better results?

    As for enlarged negatives, I have made them for contact printing with alternative processes in the past using many different methods and film, including reversal processing. However, I currently do all of this kind of work digitally, scanning from 6X9cm and 5X7" negatives and printing the negative on Pictorico with an inkjet printer. There are certainly several valid reasons for making enlarged negatives with film and wet processing but in my own case I am satisfied that I get better results via the digital route.

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    One reason to use slow films is for work with old soft-focus portrait lenses. They often show their distinctive character between f:4 and f:8, and if you use studio strobes, it's not always so easy to get the power down to that level without resorting to ND gels on the lights or ND filters on the lens, which is likely to be very large and some non-standard diameter, requiring some sort of kludge like taping filters behind the lens. It's much easier in that situation to use a slower film.

    Other than that, I don't see any image quality justification for shooting an ISO 25 film for contact prints unless you happen to like the general look of that film. I much prefer Tri-X.

  9. #9
    lee
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    Which leads me to a second question. Is there any reason to use a film of less than ISO/ASA 100 for contact printing? Based on my own experience I would say no, but perhaps someone has knowledge of a specific situation in which a very slow speed film gave better results?

    Hi Sandy,
    WRT to your second question, I don't think so. In fact, I say I don't know of a reason to use a film with the speed of less than ISO/ASA of 400. I have photographed in the Big Bend NP and if anything the wind blows all year round. Having an extra stop or two can make a big difference. With contact printing there is no grain at all.

    lee\c

  10. #10
    Ole
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    I'm still trying to come up with a need for films faster than ISO 100 in LF!

    I'm not much bothered by wind, and I like large apertures. Also most of my lenses are old, one has a fastest shutter speed of 1/50th second. How can I use that lens at f:4.5 with ISO 400 film?

    Besides, I like the tonality of slow films better.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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