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  1. #1

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    I've looked alot of places and have found times for hand processing pmk for various films, but no luck for rotary proc. 4x5 film specifically (even Gordon's book only has times for hand proc.). I got my dev. technique down pretty good w. D76 and want to give this PMK a try. Plus, thanks to GreyWolfs idea, my unicolor tanks are leak proof now. Anyway, here's what I found so far for trix 1:2:100 12min/75 at ei250 from Ed B's site, and 14min/70 ei250 from Gordon (i shoot it at 160 though)..though I think those times are about the same when compensated for the temp....And fp4 1:2:100 10min/70. Now, I've also read rotary one might want to decr. dev. time...should I or just try these times and judge and adjust from there? I'm developing all my negs at N for now to keep things consistent in the beginning learning curve.

    I plan on btw a 5min presoak in dilute sod metoborate solution, then onto dev, water stop, t4 and rinse.

    Thanks for the help!
    Chris

    Oh, I also have some Delta 3200 (ei3200) thanks to Les (thanks buddy). Should I try to use the PMK (hand proc in stainless tank) or use Rodinal? Times anyone?? I see Ed has times 12.5/75..but he shot it at 800.

  2. #2
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  3. #3

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    Fantastic! Thanks Aggie for the info!

    Chris

  4. #4

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    Well, finally! Developed some 4x5 in PMK today! Pretty cool stuff, amazing how dark that used dev gets! Used Gordon's times: 70F, 14min..at his ei of 260. I shoot at 160. Anyway, developed 6, one perfect, one underexposed and thin, and the others are too dark. It seems maybe I developing too long, but am not sure. A couple quesions?

    1 is it normal to have the clear film base on the edges to be stained or clear??
    And 2. Should I decr. my time to say 12min since 4/6 were a bit too much?

    thanks for any help!
    chris

  5. #5

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    It was my impression that PMK was determined as being inappropriate for rotary processing. At least that was the case a year ago. (maybe the formulation has been altered). That is the reason that the RolloPyro formulation was designed (for rotary processing). You may want to check with Formulary on this and make sure.

    If this is still true then your high negative density is probably partly due to aerial oxidation.

  6. #6
    lee
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    \that was my understanding Don. Rollo Pyro was the formulation that was recommended for Jobo's. PMK is for tray and tank development. I tried to use a Jobo for quite a while and could never quite get the negs to look right. I sold the Jobo and went back to the trays. Been there ever since.

    lee\c

  7. #7
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  8. #8

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    Chris, I checked with Bostick and Sullivan who along with PhotoFormulary have entered into an agreement with Gordon Hutchings on producing and selling the PMK formulation. Either Gordon is not indicating the same thing to all people or something else is lacking in communication. At any rate, this is what was located on the B&S site pertaining to pyro and PMK pyro as it pertains to rotary processing. You may benefit from checking this out more completely for yourself.

    What is Pyro?
    Pyro is actually a loose family of film developers that use the chemical pyrogallic acid. There are many variations to the basic formula, the most popular current version is Hutchings' PMK developer (for Pyro Metol Kodalk). Edward Weston used a famous formula for many years he called ABC pyro. Most pyro formulas can only be used in tray development because heavy agitation quickly oxidizes the pyro and it depletes rapidly, so B&S makes Rollo Pyro for use in Jobo™ drums and other rotary development systems.

  9. #9
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    I have been using PMK in rotary for a long time with no problems. I did decrease the time by 10% and I did find that I got better accutance by filling a Jobo with 1.25 liters of PMK and doing traditional agitation.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  10. #10

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    Thanks all for the responses. I heard/read? that using the sodium metoborate predev wash addressed the issue of rapid oxidaton and that this step made using a rotary processor possible. I could be wrong.

    But, I also am using alot of developer, 250ml for only 2 sheets. Also, I found this link of Ed's: http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Ti...200_grain.html
    And I guess my neg's just slightly less contrasty than that one, but nearly the same density. Maybe Im just not used to the stain. But I'll go with Franks suggestion of a 10% reduction, so 12 1/2min tomorrow. And Frank, the Unicolor is the only drum I have now that'll do 4x5, so I'm just using what I have (same w the PMK Donald, next time I thought I'd try pyrocat hd.

    Thanks again for the help!

    Chris

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