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  1. #1

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    Kodalith Type Developer Formula

    I need to develop some lith film to very high contrast for a project but I don't have any kodalith type developer on hand. Could someone send me a formula that would work more or less like Kodalith? I have a fairly good supply of chemicals and would likely have on hand what I need to mix the developer.


    Sandy

  2. #2

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    Kodak D-85

    Water 500 mliters
    Sodium Sulfite (A) 30 grams
    Paraformaldehyde 7.5 grams
    Sodium Bisulfite 2.2 grams
    Boric Acid crystals 7.5 grams
    Hydroquinone 22.5 grams
    Potassium Bromide 1.6 grams

    WTM 1 Liter

  3. #3
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    I need to develop some lith film to very high contrast for a project but I don't have any kodalith type developer on hand
    Ansco 81 isn't bad. It doesn't have the rapid 'infectious' action of Kodalith AB, but it doesn't require any formeldehyde or lye, either. It keeps for months.

    Per liter:

    35. gm Hydroquinone
    55. gm S. Sulfite
    80. gm S. Carbonate
    5.5 gm Citric Acid
    10. gm P. Bromide

    Use full strength, developing time not longer than 3 minutes.
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  4. #4

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    Hi Bill and Nicholas,

    Thanks for the formulas. I have everything but the paraformaldehyde so will probably go with Nicholas's formula. What does that do?

    Sandy

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You can substitute Formalin/formaldehyde solution for the Paraformaldehyde 7.5ml of 40%, then make up a Part B of 5% Sodium Hydroxide in water, mix 1+1 for use. This works very well with very sharp edges.

    It's not a scientific substitution but one based on experience, we used this commercially for about 12 years in the mid 70' & 80's.

    Ian

  6. #6

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    Kodak D-8 and D-9 are a pair you can choose from. D-9 is a classic A-B formula for infectious development of litho film. D-8 is a normal very high contrast developer.

    Kodak D-8 high contrast film developer

    Water 750 ml
    Soduim sulfite (anh) 90 g
    Hydroquinone 45 g
    Sodium hydroxide 37.5 g
    Potassium bromide 30 g
    WTM 1 l

    For litho type films
    Dilute 2:1 for use. Develop about 2 minutes at 20C. The diluted solution does not keep.
    Variation: for low temperature processing (to 0C) use undiluted, to -20C add 25% ethylene glycol.

    Kodak D-9 hydroquinone caustic film developer
    For extreme contrast with process films

    Solution A
    Water (53C) 500 ml
    Sodium bisulfite 22.5 g
    Hydroquinone 22.5 g
    Potassium bromide 22.5 g
    WTM 1 l

    Solution B
    Water 1 l
    Sodium hydroxide 52.5 g

    Use equal parts of A and B. Wash negative thoroughly after development and before fixing to avaoid stains. Use at 18C.

  7. #7

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    Ian,

    Just to clarify, I substitute 7.5ml of 40% formalin for the 7.5 g of parafomaldehyde in Part A. Then I mix a separate Part B solution of 5% sodium hydroxide. Then I dilute the Part A with Part B 1:1 for use?

    Sandy



    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    You can substitute Formalin/formaldehyde solution for the Paraformaldehyde 7.5ml of 40%, then make up a Part B of 5% Sodium Hydroxide in water, mix 1+1 for use. This works very well with very sharp edges.

    It's not a scientific substitution but one based on experience, we used this commercially for about 12 years in the mid 70' & 80's.

    Ian

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Yes, that's it.

    Back in the 70's none of my chemical suppliers could find para-Formadehyde anywhere, and no references to tell them what it was so I adder Formalin/Formaldehyde solution. When I found the developer didn't work I realised there was no alkali So I tried it 1:1 with the Part B from my Ilford ID-13, and it worked perfectly.

    I now know thanks to the internet that parformaldehyde dissolves to form Sodium Hydroxide & Formaldehyde. It's a US name and only crops up in US designed formulae from Kodak & Agfa Ansco. I've never bothered to check it's more common International name.

    Made up the way I suggest it has an extremely long shelf life until mixed.

    Ian

  9. #9

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    Ian,

    Thanks very much for the info about the sodium hydroxide! I'd made up the D85 with formalin instead of the paraformaldehyde and didn't get the expected results. Reverted back to my LD20. Now I can try the D85 again for lith printing!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post

    I now know thanks to the internet that parformaldehyde dissolves to form Sodium Hydroxide & Formaldehyde. It's a US name and only crops up in US designed formulae from Kodak & Agfa Ansco. I've never bothered to check it's more common International name.

    It is also known as Tri oxy methylene IIRC. (CH2O)3 in a 6 membered ring that falls apart in alkali.

    PE

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