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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by delphine View Post
    Whilst reviewing my rejects, I detected on one of the prints
    the pattern of the drying screens. I am using dedicated
    Kostiner drying screens.
    What you need is something twixt the screen and your
    prints. Pellon 70 is a hydrophobic, non-woven, polyester
    material. Very permeable. Ask for it at any fabric
    outlet. It is called interfacing. Dan

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    What you need is something twixt the screen and your
    prints. Pellon 70 is a hydrophobic, non-woven, polyester
    material. Very permeable. Ask for it at any fabric
    outlet. It is called interfacing. Dan
    I mentioned Pellon 70. The 70 is a heavy weight. Lighter
    weights will do and at about half the price. Be sure it fits
    the above description. The firm surfaced handles easily.

    The 70 is used as a separator material, rather than
    absorbent blotters, with my corrugated board
    stack dryer. Dan

  3. #43
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I just now found this thread again, and saw my own post.

    I have abandoned screens for drying my prints, as their only purpose is to dry the prints flat. To me that is just a waste of space to keep enough room handy for those things.
    I just hang the prints up from a nylon line and some clothes pins. Then I flatten the prints when they are almost dry, by placing them between two sheets of 4ply mat paper in one of those old print dryers. I set it to the lowest heat and let it sit for a couple of minutes. Then I take two prints and place them back to back in one of the PrintFile print pockets and put them in a binder. One print wants to curl one way and the the second print wants to curl the other way. They counter act each other, and that will keep them flat and after a while they remain flat even after I take them out of the Print File.

    No more screens for me. It seems unnecessary, but that's just how it works for me in my small house with my space limitations. You may still find them useful.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #44
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I should add that if it's a large print, I just lay them flat in a sleeve on a flat surface and weigh them down. I make so few really large prints that it's not really a concern.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #45

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    I do not have much experience with FB-paper but I noticed that there is a period while drying when the emulsion becomes sticky. I think it is about when it begins to feel dry on the back. May be, you should not touch the print while it is in this state.

    Ulrich

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