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  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    has anyone ever exposed in developer?

    What would happen if you placed the tray of developer on your enlarger, secured a piece of paper in it somehow, and made your exposure with the paper under the developer? This would seem like the ultimate in developing by inspection. Thoughts? I suppose the liquid degrades the image somehow.

  2. #2
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    10 Mar 2009

    BetterSense:

    Interesting idea! I have to try this and find out what the results are like.

    Here are my thoughts...
    1. I would think that the depth of developer will effect how much the projected image is degraded, and attenuated.
    2. Generally wet paper will be less sensitive to light than dry paper.

    Keep us posted as to you results when you do this experiment.

    Regards,
    Darwin

  3. #3
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    BetterSense:

    1) an interesting idea. If you try it, please report on your results;
    2) be very careful with the tray on your enlarger baseboard - spilled developer could cause all sorts of problems, including stains on your prints, and warping of the baseboard itself.

    Matt

  4. #4

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    I would think its a matter of timing. Slide the paper into the developer and zap it with the enlarger. Then swish a bit more. -- I see no issue rather than the length of time in developer before the zap, and the amount of light reflected from the surface of the developer--- may be dependent on depth and such.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

  5. #5
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    I tried it long ago with stabilization paper. That is paper that has developing agent incorporated in the emulsion and only needs an alkaline bath for development. When I ran out of that paper, just for fun, I soaked some ordinary paper in developer, squeegied it off and exposed it. I thought I could exposed it until the image coming up under the light merged with the negative projected image. I never tried it again.

    If you want to try, I would suggest that approach rather than a tray of developer. Any appreciable depth of liquid between the lens and paper would be likely to cause deformations due to movement, temperature differences, the phase of the Moon, etc.
    Gadget Gainer

  6. #6
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    I have exposed paper under water and under developer, mostly to get the effect of the wave action in distorting the image. When submerged the focusing can be difficult to get right. I used a flat bottom 8x10 tray that the paper would self center. I have not done POP, but I think that the highlights and shadows and respond the same as POP producing different contrast then normally expected.

    TR
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  7. #7
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    I tried it and it went too fast for my enlarger (I think you will want a very small aperture), but anyway you get funny ripples and such. Alas all I saw was that something interesting was happening and then it just blacked up on me! I haven't explored further yet. I concluded that the optimal exposure would be with the enlarger stopped down so much that the total exposure was roughly as long as the dev time of the paper in the particular developer. So for example, a ~1.5 min normal development of rc paper would require an exposure of roughly that duration, which means a really small aperture, I dunno, f/128 or something. (I say RC because fiber really changes quite a lot under water and "comes up" much slower so it may not be the best choice)

    Solarizing under water is another option to consider. So you do most of the development as usual, in the dark, then with a bit left to go, you make waves in the developer and switch on the lights and voila. Maybe if you solarize long enough then you will see the wave patterns.

    A related idea that I thought about but didn't try was to expose contact prints under water, the idea being that the water would seal the neg to the paper. But if the paper has incorporated developer then I guess you'll run into trouble.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  8. #8

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    i used to do that from time to time,
    but never with the whole tray
    just with the print wet and i re-exposed
    it and burned /dodged the image like that ..

    good to see you are having fun

    -john
    im empty, good luck

  9. #9
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    I think there was a technique like this for some sort of solarization-like effect: soak the paper in developer, squeegee, expose in enlarger till the image forms, stop bath then fix. The ultimate in stand development for paper.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    I think there was a technique like this for some sort of solarization-like effect: soak the paper in developer, squeegee, expose in enlarger till the image forms, stop bath then fix. The ultimate in stand development for paper.
    I think you are referring to the Sabattier effect.

    You expose normally and then begin development normally. At some point during the development, you flash the print to light evenly and you get both a positive and a weak negative image, sometimes with halos around objects.

    You then stop and fix normally.

    There are several color examples in my gallery.

    PE

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