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  1. #11
    eddym's Avatar
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    Well... if you had a Rollei SL2000/3000 camera and three backs for it, you could do the same thing the Hasselblad shooters do: use different backs for expanding or contracting contrast ranges.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  2. #12
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    I disagree (partially) with the other folks here. I try to expose for the shadows, but I don't get too worried about the exact development. If it is an overcast, low contrast day, I'll develop it 10 or 20% more. If the roll is generally contrasty, I'll develop it 10 or 20% less. It isn't like using sheet film, but with VC paper, it usually works out. The trick is to use the entire roll in a session. If you aren't done with the roll, develop it anyway. Is it perfect? No. Does it work better than just shooting and hoping for the best? Yes.

  3. #13
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Forget Zone System with 35mm. Give your film generous exposue (use 1/2 box speed) then soup in D23. Adjust zones with paper contrast and development controls. Your digestion, BP, and household pets will appreciate your taking the easy way out.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  4. #14
    CPorter's Avatar
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    Rating the film at half the box speed is a good idea as it will beef up the densities in the shadow areas for the entire roll. But, I would then reduce the development time to N-1 (around 20 - 30% less time) to control the densities at the high end at around Zone VII / VIII. This will help moderate the negative contrast for the high contrast frames and the lower contrast frames can be improved with the flexibility of VC printing. Not really a true ZS application, but the basic concept of "exposing for the shadows and developing for the highlights" is well considered with this approach.

  5. #15
    John Bragg's Avatar
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    This site is one I find particularly helpful. The section called UNZONE gives a lot of insight with regard to understanding a simplification of the Zone System as applied to roll films. Hope it is of some use.

    http://www.barrythornton.com/

  6. #16

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    Hi, John, thanks for that site. It is under Technique Guide and is The Nozone System.
    Last edited by Carter john; 03-13-2009 at 12:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    joko's Avatar
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    You can always shoot in strips. If you have a changing bag on hand, just peel off a segment about four inches, cock the shutter, put the film in the chamber and close the door. You'd need some light tight storage to carry the film around in; but, I bet you could improvise something simple with an old film can, for example. You'd lose a good bit of film over time because of the leader/trailer ends, but you'd get your exposure done the way you wanted. I imagine, though, over time your waste ratio would be pretty high; but then there's no reason why each one of those frames couldn't be developed individually. Good luck! J.

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