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Thread: Ansco 130

  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by titrisol
    jckspc has the following in thir glossary:


    So maybe you need to make a sulfite solution first to dilute glycin.
    As I stated previously, glycin is only slightly soluble in water.

    Glycin is quite soluble in alkaline solutions. In order to dissolve glycin in water, you need to make the water alkaline. Sodium (or potassium) sulfite will perform this function, - so will carbonate and other alkalis.

    However, if you are mixing a developer (dissolved in water) that uses both metol and glycin, the metol should be dissolved first. It is important to add no more than a pinch of sulfite before dissolving the metol. If there is too much sulfite, a large percentage of the metol may become insoluble. After the metol is dissolved, add the remaining sulfite, then add the glycin.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  2. #62
    juan's Avatar
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    Will refrigerating, or even freezing, the glycin help it keep longer?
    juan

  3. #63
    galyons's Avatar
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    Juan,
    Not very scientific, but I have found that keeping glycin in the freezer, at least double sealed, (jar in heavy sealed plastic freezer bag) significantly slows the steady progression from light tan to "not worth a s#!t" dark brown. I also found that displacing the atmosphere with nitrogen helps both freezer storage and room temp storage.

    Since I typically buy in 100g lots from PF, I think the longest that I have stored & used a supply has been about 18 months. Always worked fine.

    Cheers,
    Geary

  4. #64
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    I've found a possible substitution for water bath development with Ansco 130, at least with Azo. I call it minimal agitation - I agitate for the first 20-seconds the print is in the developer, then let it simply sit still in the developer for the remainder of the 2-minutes. My first couple of attempts seem to give about a grade 2 1/2 on Grade 3 paper.
    juan

  5. #65
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The Best of APUG

    I was thinking about using Ansco 130 as a general purpose print developer in my new darkroom setup and came across this excellent thread from a few years back that I'd forgotten about. The Moderators and the Council have been talking about looking for good threads like this one on popular topics and making them easier to find by sticking them, and I think this one qualifies--

    Ansco 130 is a popular developer either as a homebrew formula or as a kit from Photographer's Formulary. The formula is included in the thread. There's not too much off-topic meandering. There are detailed reports from longtime users, and there's an excellent test from Sandy King comparing Ansco 130 to amidol for Azo.

    If anyone comes across other threads that have these qualities, please let the moderators know, and we'll take them into consideration. We don't want so many sticky threads that they get lost, but the real gems belong at the top of the list.
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  6. #66

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    Use it 1:1 - or straight for extra contrast - or 1:2 - or with waterbath - or use it hot with cotton balls - - - develop from 2 - 10 minutes.

    Its great!



    Per Volquartz
    http://www.pervolquartz.com

  7. #67
    juan's Avatar
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    Well, following up on my previous posts, I have kept glycin in my freezer for more than two years. I have successfully used the old glycin in a glycin only film developer, and the development was just as expected. I kept the glycin in the original container, and put that container in a common freezer bag.
    juan

  8. #68
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I just tried it for sheet film development. I tried what I had shot as test negatives:
    1. Ilford Delta 100 4x5
    2. Kodak TMax 400 4x5
    3. Ilford FP4 5x7
    4. Ilford HP5 5x7
    The negs all look much better than I had hoped. If I have time tonight when I return home I will scan them to see if my first visual impression is right.
    I diluted 1+4 and the full cycle was between 3 and 5 minutes. Next time I'll try 1+10 upon John Nanian's advice. Slow it down a bit, avoid uneven development.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  9. #69
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    So after using Ansco 130 for a few days, I'm really pleased. The prints look snappy, and there's something to be said for the convenience of a developer with a long tray life. It's great being able to pop into the darkroom and make a couple of prints without all the setup and mixing chemistry every time. I'll still use amidol for some things, but I think I'll be keeping a tray of Ansco 130 filled for general use.
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  10. #70
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    The prints look snappy, and there's something to be said for the convenience of a developer with a long tray life. It's great being able to pop into the darkroom and make a couple of prints without all the setup and mixing chemistry every time. I'll still use amidol for some things, but I think I'll be keeping a tray of Ansco 130 filled for general use.
    My thoughts exactly David. I've settled on Ansco 130 (PF130) for almost all of my prints. When I get a neg that's a little too hot for my Kentona in 130 I put it aside and, once I've accumulated a few, I mix up some Amidol and use it with a water bath. With that exception I believe Ansco to be every bit as good as Amidol. And as you stated, the convenience is hard to beat.



 

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