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  1. #1
    outwest's Avatar
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    Overexposed Tri-X

    That's what I get for loading a camera and not making a note as to what I put in it. I assumed it was either VP or TMY so rated it at 100. Fortunately I had an X1 filter on and didn't apply the full factor so I could shoot at 60 at f/8. I guess that only puts me a stop or a stop and a half over. So any suggestions for processing in PMK or Rodinal so I don't block it up too badly? Should I just cut development by 10 or 15%? Or, would this be a good time to try stand development with highly dilute Rodinal?

  2. #2
    trexx's Avatar
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    I always under rate TX/TXP by one stop; 200/160, and develop with published. I would think your are golden.
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  3. #3

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    Develop normally. If you "pull" (i.e., develop for less time), you will just lower the contrast of your negative. The 1-to-2-stop overexposure should be withing the films "lattitude." You may see a bit more grain and the negatives will certainly be denser overall. You will need to print longer.

    Best,

    Doremus Scudder

  4. #4
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    Stop and a half? Not even an issue.

    When you're 4 stops off, then worry.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    Develop normally. If you "pull" (i.e., develop for less time), you will just lower the contrast of your negative. The 1-to-2-stop overexposure should be withing the films "lattitude." You may see a bit more grain and the negatives will certainly be denser overall. You will need to print longer.

    Best,

    Doremus Scudder
    Stop and a half takes zone 7 or 8 and pushes it into unprintable white.

    If you are using a normal developer D-76 or so, cut development time by 10%. You might find you always shoot it this way. I did my entire photo school portfolio using about these values (actually -20% with a little known continuous random agitation technique).

    Or... use Rodinal 1+150, stand development for 90 minutes. It will give you grain but no blown out highlights. A image look you won't forget. Very... graphic.

    Best,
    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  6. #6
    clayne's Avatar
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    And at the same time, like color, sometimes highlights are just in the way.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  7. #7

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    k_jupiter,

    Modern Tri-X should hold separation up to (and above) Zone XI when developed normally. With overexposed film then, the entire tonal range is just shifted higher on the negative. Films with more pronounced shoulders will, indeed, block the highlights when overexposed, but Tri-X has a long straight line section ensuring adequate separation even three stops overexposed. If one wished to retain the normal contrast range, development should simply be normal. Reducing development will decrease contrast and highlight density, without significantly affecting shadow detail.

    Best,

    Doremus Scudder
    www.DoremusScudder.com

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    Stop and a half takes zone 7 or 8 and pushes it into unprintable white.
    Only if you print it min.exp. / max. black. I think Tri X straight lines to Zone XIII or XIV. It may be that an 8x10 print will be three days at f 8 though!!!

    Bob H
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  9. #9

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    I've found that Tri-X prints well even when overexposed by a stop or more. I've been surprised at results when printing Tri-X that is badly overexposed or overprocessed.

  10. #10

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    That's what makes Tri-X so popular. But seriously. I've overexposed some frames with Tri-X, sometimes by up to two stops, and it's not so bad with normal development. It's not so good either. If the contrast range of the scene isn't too harsh, you'll be ok. If not, you're going to have trouble printing the highlights. You'll have some detail in the highlights even with normal development, but they will be dense and difficult to separate. A softer contrast grade of paper and some judicious burning in of the highlights will help. Maybe it would be best to pull back on development a bit. If I was doing this I'd cut back about 15 to 20 percent on the development and see where that left me. You'll have something to print in any case.
    Frank Schifano

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