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  1. #1

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    Glossy FB prints

    How does one do this? I use Glossy paper and can't get the same kind of gloss as RC paper.

    I read that ferrotyping is one way to make it glossy, but it's a really old process and ferrotypes are hard to get and hard to keep clean.

    Any other ways to make FB prints as glossy as RC prints?

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    No glazing is the only way.

    You can improve the natural gloss slightly by steaming. Once the print is dry & flat hold it over a source of steam, with care and the natural gloss is improved. This worked well with Agfa Record Rapid & MCC, also Forte Polywarmtone.

    Ian

  3. #3

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    wax, varnish. do a search, here and on google. if you are not an archival nut then some renaissance wax might just do the trick.

  4. #4
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    Ther have been several recent threads on this topic. Of course, the easy way to get the high gloss finish is to use RC paper. One of the points of appeal to air-dried FB is that it does NOT have the mirror like finish of RC gloss.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  5. #5

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    Dear Wailong,

    The easy thing to try (I've never done it) is to get a nice piece of glass, roll a wet print onto it with the glossy side against the glass. You can look at the print through the glass to be sure that the print is making full contact. If there are bubbles, those areas will not take the gloss. If you have room, you might be able to find an old Arkay 150 drum dryer. I saw one on Craig's List in Chicago this year for $200. I have one and I occasionally mistake old glossy FB prints for RC prints. There are cheaper (and less space intensive) alternatives. Flat bed dryers store easily and really aren't hard to take care of.

    Here is a link to another method: http://www.w7wwg.com/prints.htm

    Neal Wydra

  6. #6

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    Thanks. Print flattener solution? Never read in any of my darkroom books, but will look for it.

  7. #7

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    Glossy fiber-based paper will only take on the "mirror" like finish if dried on a ferrotype plate, or a heated dryer that has a ferrotype surface (mirror surface). Drum type motorized dryers were once as common as salt. They were made in all sizes, from tabletop units labeled Prinz, to floor standing units in various widths from Pako, which used both electric and/or gas as heating sources. They can product the "look" you wish from fiber glossy paper. There have also been various models of non-motorized heated glossy dryers, with either a small drum or a plate with a cloth apron to keep the print against the drying surface.

    If you are using a non-motorized glossy dryer, you really have to roll the print onto the dryer surface quite hard with a brayer to ensure even gloss in drying.

    In general, from my 40 years of experience in darkroom, single-weight glossy fiber paper glosses best, and the only vendor for such paper is now Slavich.

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It's worth noting that the Gloss of a well glazed fibre based print is far higher than any resin coated paper.

    Ian

  9. #9

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    We used to use print flattener in high school. IIRC, Edwal made it and it contained a large dose of glycerin. I don't know how this made the print flatter, glossier or what it did to the archival properties.

  10. #10

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    Here's all I've been able to dig up through a search of my archives:

    Print Flattener Formula:
    glycerin 2oz.
    water to make 32oz.
    -or-
    1 oz glyceryn in a gallon of DISTILLED water. Mix with a magnetic stirrer for 1/2 hour. When the glycerine disappears from the vortex, it is in solution.

    *The first mystery ingredient is a little photoflow 1:200. The Second is probably a preservative.

    *clean plates with ammonium chloride, the main ingredient in Bon Ami.

    Now, I've not tried any of these, so proceed with some caution. The sources repute to be good though. True 'old-timer' wisdom here.

    Good luck!



 

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