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  1. #1

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    Is this caused by development?

    I developed my first roll of 120 a few days ago. I noticed a vertical "band" in 4 of the 12 exposures (exposures #4, 6, 9, and 10).

    I can't be sure, but I don't think it's caused by the camera because the shots used different apertures and shutter speeds. On the other hand, I'm not convinced it's caused by the developer either because the exposures would either have this "band" or not have it entirely.

    So could this have been caused by the developing process?


  2. #2

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    Despite the commonly heard "wisdom" about gentle agitation, that advice can be taken too far. This is a classic example of what happens when you don't agitate sufficiently. Medium format film developed in small tanks is more prone to exhibiting these problems than 35 mm stocks. If you're using a SS tank, try to get at least 5 to 7 good snappy inversion in 5 seconds every 1/2 minute. If plastic tanks are your thing and you like to use the agitation stick instead of inversion, go for at least 5 to 7 complete back and forth motions in 5 seconds every 1/2 minute.
    Frank Schifano

  3. #3

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    Great, thanks!

    I just find it weird that it appears in specific exposures and not at all in adjacent ones.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    This is a classic example of what happens when you don't agitate sufficiently.
    Why would it be confined to certain frames (and non-contiguous ones at that), though? General uneven development, especially the "more developed at the edges" pattern, would make sense---edge effects could cause the agitation to be more effective near the edges of the film, leaving the middle underdeveloped---but a single asymmetric band that doesn't span frames? To me it looks more likely to be something in-camera, perhaps a very faint light leak that only has a visible effect when the light is from a certain angle.

    What's the camera? Specifically, is the band parallel to the film edge (as it would be with a TLR) or perpendicular (as with most other designs)?

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  5. #5

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    Agree with ntenny. I recently had the exact same problem (looked identical to your anomaly) with a Leica R4S that only fogged when the light was at a particular angle, and only a handful of frames on a roll. Replaced the light seals and seal around the film canister window and problem disappeared.

    -F.

  6. #6

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    It's a Kiev 88. The band is parallel to the film edge.

    Looking at the four exposures that are affected, the light (sun) is at very different angles in all four.

    Edit:
    If it's a light leak problem, wouldn't the band be lighter than the rest of the frame?
    Last edited by CanuckBassist; 03-20-2009 at 02:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I absolutely agree with this . These are road ruts that are minus density across nuetral areas that are not agitated or better put, the developer has not reached the film surface evenly and fast enough that produce dark bands in a positive image of the negative.

    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Despite the commonly heard "wisdom" about gentle agitation, that advice can be taken too far. This is a classic example of what happens when you don't agitate sufficiently. Medium format film developed in small tanks is more prone to exhibiting these problems than 35 mm stocks. If you're using a SS tank, try to get at least 5 to 7 good snappy inversion in 5 seconds every 1/2 minute. If plastic tanks are your thing and you like to use the agitation stick instead of inversion, go for at least 5 to 7 complete back and forth motions in 5 seconds every 1/2 minute.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by CanuckBassist View Post
    If it's a light leak problem, wouldn't the band be lighter than the rest of the frame?
    Oh. Um, yeah. Well, obviously it's a *dark* leak problem! :-)

    I still think it looks weird for an agitation issue, though. My next guess would be that it has something to do with the shutter travel---the Kiev 88 has a horizontal shutter, right?---but I can't easily explain that either. Something slowing down the first curtain briefly at that point?

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I absolutely agree with this . These are road ruts that are minus density across nuetral areas that are not agitated or better put, the developer has not reached the film surface evenly and fast enough that produce dark bands in a positive image of the negative.
    This roll was developed in HC-110 B for 16 minutes. Would what you're suggesting be possible? Given that the developer was working for so long, any difference in contact between various areas of the film surface would be very small relatively. No?

  10. #10
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    Hi there

    Its not the length of time that is most critical, It is the first 10-20 seconds in the developer which is extremely important to have an even flow of developer to the whole film.
    Specifically like the image you show which has lots of nuetral tones.
    the dark areas we see are basically dev not getting on these areas fast enough therefore not *setting* equally across the film surface, that when printed create dark mess that you are getting.
    This problem shut down my lab for a period of time until we figured the problem.
    Now with all film we agitate the first 10-30 seconds by hand with a twisting inversion. one hand at top one at bottom as if you were grasping the steering wheel of your car. then turn the canister 180degrees, by holding the container this way it is impossible not to invert and twist the chem onto the film, with a firm tap on the bottom after each inversion to dislodge andy air bubbles.
    hope this makes sense and helps you with your problem.
    Also I do not skimp on chem in the process stage.
    QUOTE=CanuckBassist;771199]This roll was developed in HC-110 B for 16 minutes. Would what you're suggesting be possible? Given that the developer was working for so long, any difference in contact between various areas of the film surface would be very small relatively. No?[/QUOTE]

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