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  1. #11

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    The thing that I find confusing is simply the amount of different combinations of films and developers, and the times and agitations that you have to use and so on and so forth. It's just that it looks complicated, but I suspect it's not that bad if you keep it simple.
    Looks like I'll have to find a lab to push process my APX400. At the moment, I'm not willing to take the risk of ruining it.
    Anyway, more questions:
    I have two bulk rolls of Pan F+ that could be well over 10 years old, always stored in the fridge and sealed. Will this still work, and should I develop it in the Microphen?
    Second, is Ilford Ilfosol 3 and Ilfosol S the same thing? Or is there a difference?
    Also, I have a roll of Delta 3200 that has dev times inside the packaging. What does 1+0 mean?

    Thanks again for all your help so far.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by funkpilz View Post
    The thing that I find confusing is simply the amount of different combinations of films and developers, and the times and agitations that you have to use and so on and so forth. It's just that it looks complicated, but I suspect it's not that bad if you keep it simple..
    Hence the advice to start with one film and one developer and work from there. Don't change more than one thing at a time!

    Quote Originally Posted by funkpilz View Post
    Looks like I'll have to find a lab to push process my APX400. At the moment, I'm not willing to take the risk of ruining it..
    I would only trust very specialized labs one such a job. It's probably better to buy a second role of APX400, use it in more or less the same lighting conditions as the first film and develop that one in something like Microphen or XTOL. Both are excelent developers for pushing films.

    Quote Originally Posted by funkpilz View Post
    Anyway, more questions:
    I have two bulk rolls of Pan F+ that could be well over 10 years old, always stored in the fridge and sealed. Will this still work, and should I develop it in the Microphen?
    Second, is Ilford Ilfosol 3 and Ilfosol S the same thing? Or is there a difference?
    Also, I have a roll of Delta 3200 that has dev times inside the packaging. What does 1+0 mean?
    The PanF will even be fine in another 10 years. Slow films lose quality very slowly and can be kept years passed their expirency date. You can develop it in Microphen, but i would choose a more general developer like XTOL or D76 / ID11. Rodinal as also a very good choice for this film. Microphen is a developer used for pushing films at the expence of creating more grain. Pushing and grain is probably not what your after when using PanF. XTOL has also the advantage that it has good keeping qualities - in full and closed bottles at least half a year. Rodinal has even better keeping qualities: probably something like centuries.
    Can't help you with your questions on Ilfosol 3 vs. S.
    Microphen and Delta3200 is a good combination. 1+0 means it should be used as undiluted stock solution. 1+1 means you should use as much water as stock solution and 1+2 means twice as much water as stock solution.
    Last edited by Huub; 03-22-2009 at 04:32 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  3. #13

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    As far as your Pan F is concerned: there's only one way to find out. It may have lost something, but to what extent.... Give it a go, but if it is still OK, you may need play around with dev times to get the best from it. Since you are fairly new to this, it maybe worth waiting a while until you get the fresh stuff straight.

    As far a Microphen and Pan F is concerned, I would not say that it is a recomended developer. Pan F is a very fine grain film. I use it quite a lot and find that high acutance developers like Rodinal (if you can get any - I stockpiled) will give you sharper images. I've not tried it, but you might even find that using a fine grain developer on a fine grain film may reduce edge sharpness to a point where that image could look fairly soft. Might be wrong - it's just a guess.

    1+0 (if you looking at the dev dilutions) means that the given times are for the stock solution. That is the full strength solution made up from the instructions on the box (i.e. 1+1 would be equal parts stock and water - 1+2: one part stock to 2 parts water, etc.), if that makes any sense.

    Geoff

  4. #14

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    Edit: Sorry, looks like Huub and I were typing at the same time.

  5. #15

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    I have a 12 page Agfa PDF of technical data on their B&W films. Email me if you want me to send you that file.

    There are good tutorials at Ilford's website. For film developing, for example.

    larry.manuel@sympatico.ca

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by funkpilz View Post
    I'm sorry if this has been posted before, but I felt like I should have a thread of my own :P
    I'm relatively new to photography, I only started last summer, but I've been trying to learn as fast as I can. Now I want to advance to the next stage and develop my own B&W film.
    I have a load of Agfa APX 100, and three 17m rolls of Pan F+ and HP5+, the former of which I would like to experiment with (it was the cheapest out of the batch). Now I've googled for developing times and found some useful charts, but I still have some questions. Here we go:
    Is there a specific amount and timing of the agitations as you develop? I'm looking at 9 minutes of stock diluted (whatever that may be) Microphen.
    I hear you can wash the film three times instead of using a stop bath, so that's what I intend to do, but how do I use the fixer?
    How far can I push APX 100?
    Thanks for answering any of these questions, and again, I'm sorry if this has been posted before.
    Agitate every 30 seconds, fix 5 minutes while agitating every 30 seconds
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
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    RIP Kodachrome

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by EASmithV View Post
    Agitate every 30 seconds, fix 5 minutes while agitating every 30 seconds
    Fixing times vary with the fixer, how many rolls have been put through the fixer, and even the film. Rapid fixers (based on ammonium thiosulfate) typically fix in about 2 minutes when fresh. A 5-minute fix time, if that's accurate, probably indicates use of a non-rapid (sodium thiosulfate) fixer.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWGirl View Post
    Hm... I guess my question is why in the name of pete you'd want to push a gorgeous film like APX 100???? Is it 35mm or 120mm? either way, if you are planning on pushing it, send it to me instead... it will be in a good home with someone who loves it.
    My thoughts too!

    If you've only got APX 400, well do what you wish with that! I suggest you start your developing career with the HP5, much more forgiving than I remember PanF to be.

    If the APX 400 @ 1600 is important, get another roll and try a time you deduce from data in the MDC. You could do pieces of the roll to zero in on an acceptable time, however don't expect miracles, those negs will exhibit some undesirable qualities.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    Fixing times vary with the fixer, how many rolls have been put through the fixer, and even the film. Rapid fixers (based on ammonium thiosulfate) typically fix in about 2 minutes when fresh. A 5-minute fix time, if that's accurate, probably indicates use of a non-rapid (sodium thiosulfate) fixer.
    You can probably go close to 10 times over the required fixing time, without causing harm, so 5 minutes in the fixer is not unreasonable, even if it only needs 2 minutes.

    Best way to determine fixing time, is the clear test, take some fixer, put a drop on a scrap piece of unprocessed film, wait 30 seconds, put the scrap piece of film in the fixer start timing, when you can't see where the drop was placed, that is the clear time. Double this is the fixing time, when the clear test means a fixing time over twice what it would be with fresh fixer, toss the fixer and mix up fresh. So if the clear time with fresh fixer is 1 minute, your fixing time is 2 minutes, when it reaches 4 minutes, toss the fixer, and make fresh. You don't have to test each roll, just test the first 2 or 3 to see how long to extend the time for each roll, then add that time on if doing multiple rolls, test the first roll each session, and your good to go.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  10. #20

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    Okay, I finally got my head out of the dark bag, and I'm back with results!
    Thanks to all of your competent help, I can now proudly claim to be a home developer. I just developed my first roll ever, it was a test roll of the APX 100. I developed at 24°C, 1+9 Ilfosol 3, for 5 minutes. I agitated 5 times (not seconds, my timer isn't accurate enough) every 30 seconds. I stopped with (roughly) 24°C water, three runs of it, agitating constantly (and fiercely) every time. I fixed with Ilford Rapid Fixer diluted at 1+9 as well (is this correct?). Then I wiped the negatives down and hung them up to dry. Now I'm waiting for them to be scannable.

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