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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    I have seen film curl badly if put in an overheated drying cabinet...
    I've seen TriX that was left for *days* in a mildly heated drying cabinet. It wasn't curly, that would be an understatement. It curled both vertically and horizontally. Actually 3 pairs of hands were needed to make a contact print

  2. #12

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    I tried the steam technique i was talking about, it worked okay but the negatives ended up curling again later. How about a dry mount press?

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Repeat question - have you tried rolling the film up with the emulsion side out in a film developing reel? Try it. Let it sit for a day like that.

    Clarification after re-reading my own post... This is after the film is processed and dried. (Man, what's in my head and what gets put in print is sometimes not even close to being the same).

    Sorry for the ambiguity.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 03-25-2009 at 03:05 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Dumba$$ writing
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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  4. #14

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    Negative Curling

    Hi. This is what I learnt in a news darkroom many years ago. We used to dry the plastic base of the film with good quality chamois leather. Make sure you get all the drops off, because you only get drying marks on the plastic base. You don't touch the emulsion side at all as you won't get drying marks on the emulsion. Using a drying cupboard is not necessary unless you are in a hurry.

  5. #15

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    "How about a dry mount press?"

    Good Evening, Nick,

    Probably not a good idea! It would, I think, be far too easy to damage film that way, either through excess heat or physical damage from the pressure itself if the platen has any slight irregularity. The reverse curling method mentioned in previous posts (either on a reel or some other cylindrical form) will handle the problem almost all the time. Just give it time to work!

    Konical

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Repeat question - have you tried rolling the film up with the
    emulsion side out in a film developing reel? Try it. Let it sit
    for a day like that.
    May help. Humidify as well. With the film in reel, place the
    reel in a sealable container. Elevate the reel, add some no
    more than warm water, then seal. Give it a few days. Dan

  7. #17
    CuS
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    Curling can be due to many issues bit I find humidity to be the biggest factor. Also, I recently switched to a hardening fixer and my longitudinal curling is definately more pronounced.

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