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  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Arista EDU Ultra 400 120 film...what is it?

    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/190420...0-iso-120-size

    I'm looking at adding many rolls of this to my freestylephoto cart because it's cheap, and fast. But I would like to know at least something about its characteristics other than nominal speed. Anyone know if this corresponds to another film emulsion out there? Have you tried it yourself and have impressions to add?

    I wish Arista Premium 400 came in 120, but if wishes were horses, we'd all be eating steak.

  2. #2
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    Foma 400. I agree with you on the Arista Premium 120, because I'm not a fan of Fomapan, but I would love some cheap Tri-X
    David

    A Holga is an ugly woman, a Brownie is a delicious treat.

    dromanophoto.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    jmcd's Avatar
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    That is Fomapan 400. It is a lovely film with great tone and beautiful grain. The base in the 120 curls impressively enough to make it somewhat hard to handle, unless it is dried in a humid environment. I find the actual speed is somewhere around 240 in D-76, 320 in Xtol, and 200 in HC-110.

  4. #4
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    Indeed Fomapan 400. For this film take a speed enhanced developer which some are already mentioned: Xtol/Excel W27, DD-X, Diafine, Microphen and make an E.I. around 320.
    You can clearly see on the dataskeet that the regular iso speed is around iso 200-320 with most commercial developers.
    http://www.foma.cz/upload/foma/prilohy/F_pan_400_en.pdf

    BTW interesing to know what are the specific differences between Xtol (5ltr.) and Excel (1 ltr.) because both are based on Ascorbic Acid.


  5. #5
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/190420...0-iso-120-size


    I wish Arista Premium 400 came in 120, but if wishes were horses, we'd all be eating steak.
    Or horsemeat!

    My question is, why do these films not have the speed they're rated at? Once you know, they you can compensate, but it just bugs me. Kodak, Ilford, etc. work pretty well in most situations at rated speed.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  6. #6
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    If I can't get 400 out of it with d76, I might change my opinion as to its value. 200 isn't terribly slow but Fuji Neopan 400 is only slightly more expensive at $3.09.

  7. #7
    RobertV's Avatar
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    Well that's a choice you can make.
    Neopan 400 120 roll film (Fuji) is around Eur. 3,20 while Fomapan 400 is Eur. 2,50 (Compared with a single film buy.)
    Iso 250 or iso 320 is not bad at all but maybe the Fomapan films should be mentioned: Fomapan Action 320, Fomapan Creative 160 and Fomapan Classic 100. Further it's the only company who is still producing B&W slide film: Fomapan R 100 (indeed a real iso 100 B&W slide film).

    Creative IS the Fomapan 200. A nice film (iso 160) for architecture. Here one of my best (35mm) results with this film in Prague:


  8. #8
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Actually, on freestylephoto the branded Fomapan 400 is the same price as the Fuji Neopan 400. Anyone know if Neopan 400 reaches box speed? I'm usually not a speed freak but when working with a camera with limited shutter speeds and a lens that likes to be stopped down, I find it easier to add ND sometimes than to add light.

  9. #9

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    I'm using Neopan a lot lately.

    And I shoot it at 400 with success. My developement times tend to be slightly longer than the published versions, though. I'm using Arista liquid (one shot0 at 1:9 @ 68 deg for nine minutes. The Arista liq. times seem fairly close to published times for D76 1:1 for your reference.

    Jo

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertV View Post
    BTW interesing to know what are the specific differences between Xtol (5ltr.) and Excel (1 ltr.) because both are based on Ascorbic Acid.
    I've seen it implied that Fomadon Excel is a close clone of Kodak XTOL; however, I've never seen this confirmed in any way. FWIW, the Massive Dev Chart lists times of 9:30 and 15:00 for developing Fomapan 400 in Excel and XTOL, respectively, both at 1+1 dilution. That tends to contradict the claim that the developers are nearly identical; however, it could be that these times were arrived at by different people using different procedures and criteria for correct development, so it's not really very strong evidence. It's also conceivable that the stock solutions are at different concentration to begin with, so they might be exactly equivalent if they were diluted to different degrees.

    Although there are few commercial ascorbate developers, there are a fair number of mix-it-yourself ascorbate formulas, including DS-10, DS-12, PC-TEA, PC-Glycol, E76, and others. These can vary quite a bit in character, development time, and so on. Thus, I wouldn't draw any strong conclusions simply based on the fact that two developers use ascorbic acid (or sodium ascorbate).

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