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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Mexico City
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    I use it a lot... in my Mamiya 7 and Rollei 6008... give me 20 shots in Mamiya en 32 in rollei 645 format... The film is great because is almost "clear", bpf very low. It's hard to find in US, and in Mexico no way, I have to ask my US friends to bring me some when they come.
    Jose A. Martinez

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Los Angeles
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    Jose, can you order to freestyle for Mexico?

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
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    963
    Tri-x 320 is way different than Tri-x 400, as had been said. The tri-x 320 in 220 is the same film as tri-x sheet film. It gives a very different tonal scale, with strong blacks to whites, rather than a tonal scale of grays as with the 400 film. In high contrast light there is considerable danger of blowing out the highlights. Many Tri-x 320 advocates, of whom I am one, use it with a compensating developer such as pyro or dilute HC110. I rate it at 100 to 160 and develop to take care of the highlights.

    BTW, the 220 film doesn't have paper backing on the film, only on the leader and trailer of the roll. The film lies flatter in the film plane. This is noticeable when shooting with wide fstops.

    The best reels I've found to load 220 film are the plastic reels from jobo. the more macho stainless steel reels for 220 are an exercise in frustration.

    Take care,
    Tom

  4. #14

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    Jan 2009
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    Tom, I've developed the first half of a 220roll for 12min in HC110 68 f. it came out a little thin,then the second half for 15 min looks better more dense.Have not contact printed the second half yet. also 2min presoak in distilled water. Shot the flim 320asa and 175asa alternating every other frame. 15min with 1:63 dilution is that close to what your using?
    mike

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Plymouth. UK.
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    I have downloaded the technical data from Kodak for this film. I noticed that the recommended times for D-76 stock is 9 minutes and D-76 diluted 1:1 is 12`:45" at 68*F (20*C). The sheet-film version however, has considerably shorter times, even shorter than 400TX.
    I might try using the developer at full-strength considering the long-ish times required.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    New Jersey
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    963
    Hi Mike. I can't give you reliable development times. I haven't used HC110 since I started using Pyrocat HD in 2003, I think it was. I also tend to overexpose and underdevelop pretty substantially. My typical exposure in contrasty sunlight is 1/60 at f16.

    Ansel Adams used dilute HC110 with Tri-X 320. you might find some details in one of his books.

    Here's an excellent HC110 website with quite a bit of info if you haven't seen it yet:

    http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/

    Take care,
    Tom

  7. #17

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    WOW!,about asa 60, thats quite a drop in speed.Ya I have Ansels books ,been awhile since I've looked at them,have to do a review. Well we all reach our own system of processing eventually,just tiring to cut corners. thanks for the web site,gotta go to Riverside to see the show bye now.
    mike

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