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  1. #1
    Rick-in-LB's Avatar
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    Tri-X 320 or 400

    Tri-X 320 or 400. What actually is the big difference of the two? I have used 320 but 400 is a lot easier to get. Is this a personal preference or what? Any enlightenment on this. I love the 125PX but this is a different love affair!

  2. #2
    Lee L's Avatar
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    TXP is designed for studio portraiture and has a different characteristic curve and other differences from what's now designated 400TX. TXP isn't available in 35mm.

    See Kodak's tech bulletin and the later posts in this thread:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/5...tml#post764582

    Lee

  3. #3
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Txp does a better job with mids and highs somewhat at the expense of shadows. Tx is flatter throughout the tonal range and is probably a better general purpose film. I don't know much about B&W so I'm sure someone will come along and correct me or add better information.

    *

  4. #4
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
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    The 320 is sheet film and the 400 is roll film.
    Roger

  5. #5
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtbadman View Post
    The 320 is sheet film and the 400 is roll film.
    Roger
    TXP, the 320, comes in sheets and 120 rolls.
    400TX, the 400, comes in 35mm and 120 rolls.

    Lee

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by rtbadman View Post
    The 320 is sheet film and the 400 is roll film.
    Roger
    Partially true. The 320 also comes in 120 and 220 rolls. I use both films a lot and prefer the tonal range of the 320. For high contrast situations the 400 is better.

  7. #7
    Roger Thoms's Avatar
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    I stand corrected, I use the Tri-X sheet film and new that came in 320. I just assumed that all Tri-X roll film was 400 as that was all I had seen.
    Roger

  8. #8
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I also heard that TXP was designed to be retouched, having a special base or something. Being a youth, I don't even know what film retouching is or how it's done, but that's what I heard.

  9. #9
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    I find the grain in TXP to be somewhat finer and a "tighter" overall tone with it. TX is easier to get, has more contrast control and is almost impossible to blow out highlights (within reason of course). Ansel Adams used TXP in HC-110 which is a very difficult combination to get right, although it looks good when it works; TX in D-76 (or an equivalent) is much easier to use and still gives great results. TX in HC-110 is very difficult to get right and often leads to difficult negatives.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  10. #10
    Rick-in-LB's Avatar
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    Thanks, some good information. I am trying to get my film/developer combination together. I read somewhere here in apug that once you have a combination nailed down you will understand it and then go for more. You would probably be shocked on how many developers I have on my shelf that I don't use anymore.

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