Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,666   Posts: 1,623,963   Online: 757
      
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 70
  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,691
    Images
    148
    The concentrate you make up yourself. You can cut the KBr further to 0.5g

    Ilford PQ Developer (un-numbered formula published in the 50's PQ Version of ID-20)

    Phenidone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.5 g
    Sodium Sulphite (anh) . . . . . . . . 50 g
    Hydroquinone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 g
    Sodium Carbonate . . . . . . . . . . . 60 g
    Potassium Bromide . . . . . . . . . . 2 g
    Water to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 litre

    Use 1+3 Develop 1½ - 2 mins 20ºC

    Neutral/Cold tones: Add 5ml Benzotriazole solution (1%) to each litre of working solution. (Becomes ID-62) To increase the Cold tone further add further Benzotriazole in 5ml increments.

    Warm tone: Add 7.5 ml Potassium Bromide 1% solution to each litre of working solution. To increase the Warm tone add further Potassium Bromide to suit.

    This Developer formula is identical to Forte FD-203 which is recommended for Forte Polygrade papers, including Poly-warm tone. (No Benzotriazole)

    Ian

  2. #12
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    Not being a chemist nor even scientifically minded, I go with what is told to me by the experts and with my own experience.

    Real cold tone is, first and foremost, in the paper itself. That being said, I FEEL that the significant increase in metol in Ansco 103, compared to say, D-72, is an help in producing colder tones. That, plus the limiting of bromide in the stock solution to just enough to keep print tone fairly constant--rather than preventing fog. I leave it to the benzotriazole to limit fog and to help produce a colder tone. I was told not to eliminate the bromide completely, as bromide is produced as a by-product of the developing process, and that a small amount of bromide to begin with helps maintain more constant print tone.
    I agree with Ian that too much benzo is not a good thing; and that adding it to the working solution is a good way to get fairly precise control of print tone.
    So--if'n ya wantz cold tones; use a cold tone paper--but the developers can help if bromide is kept to a minimum.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South Norfolk, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,928
    Images
    68
    John,

    An interesting characteristic of the ILFORD cooltone developer as profiled in the magazine article was its ability to make Kentona shift to a cold tone image.

    Tom.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    921
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    John,

    An interesting characteristic of the ILFORD cooltone developer as profiled in the magazine article was its ability to make Kentona shift to a cold tone image.

    Tom.
    And it does-MGWT also.Needs additional exposure though
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    459
    Hello

    Have just had a look at the article and dug out the original prints and the Kentona in cooltone really is a lovely blue black. The magazine repro is a little bit lighter and a touch more cyan. It's always tricky with these sort of tests as the reproduction will never be exact for toned black and white prints unles accurate scanning and extensive proofing is done which would only happen for a fine art book and not for magazines. The worst occasion was something similar I did for the BJP. The same image processed through cooltone and warmtone dev came out almost the same murky grey in repro. And all the supplied prints were reproduced about a stop too light!

    I have tried adding Benzitriazole to different developers and have got some very nice 'cold' prints but still nothing like the Harman Cooltone, which with MGWT, Forte and a few others gave such wonderful blue blacks. One day when I've got time, I'll get in the darkroom with lots of formulae and raw chemistry from Silverprint. Then I can sell the powder developer as 'Crawford's Cooltone!' Actually, this makes me think. It was discontinued I believe for a mixture of poor sales balanced with the keeping properties of the solution. (Legal note; this may be wrong!) If so, why don't Harman sell it in powder form which will keep well on the shelves. It could also be sold cheaper perhaps? As Michael Maunder of Speedibrews says, 'we don't sell water.' Just a thought.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South Norfolk, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,928
    Images
    68
    Mike,

    Have you tried Maxim Muir's Blue-Black developer?

    Tom.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    Mike,

    Have you tried Maxim Muir's Blue-Black developer?

    Tom.
    No I haven't though I've got the formula in the Darkroom Cookbook so will try it out.
    Ta
    Mike

  8. #18
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Stratford-upon-Avon, England
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,413
    Mike, I really miss Cooltone Dev

    If you come up with a powder kit I will buy some.

    As for poor sales, I could never find a reliable source of it - its the chicken and the egg scenario - we don't stock it & people don't buy it

    Martin

  9. #19
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,691
    Images
    148
    Maxim Muir's Blue Black Developer isn't to dissimilar to ID62/D72 when you look closely. Divide his quantities by 3.6 and you get:

    Phenidone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.61 g
    Sodium Sulphite (anh) . . . . . . . . 50 g
    Hydroquinone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.75 g
    Sodium Hydroxide. . . . . . . . . . . . 9.72 g
    Benzotriazole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.42 g (42ml 1%)
    Water to, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 litre

    Commercial liquid developers (Agfa & Ilford) usually substitute Sodium Carbonate with Potassium or Sodium Hydroxide and Potassium Carbonate the balance of Hydroxide/Carbonate varies, but when the Hydroxide is too high the keeping properties suffer. Maxim Muir suggest a shelf life of a month and a short tray life for his developer. The level of Hydroxide is

    Image colour/tone is related to grain size, it would be interesting to see what effect dropping the Sulphite level might have in a formula like ID-62 along with the increase in Benzotriazole. In addition switching from Phenidone to Metol which is colder working.

    Ian

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,085
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw View Post
    Mike,

    Have you tried Maxim Muir's Blue-Black developer?

    Tom.
    I did, but it was some time ago using Kodak Polymax and Ilford MG papers. I wasn't impressed. The results were somewhat (not a lot) colder than Dektol, but the quality was inferior. The remarks above about Kentmere papers are instructive. The variety of tones you get with various developers definitely depends on the brand of paper you use. The old Agfa papers were noted for being able to give superior cold tones. I wonder if the papers Adox is now selling approximate them.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin