Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,490   Posts: 1,542,942   Online: 877
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 32
  1. #21
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Milton, DE, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,980
    Blog Entries
    29
    Images
    19
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.167 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

    Everything has been covered here well. Now for the shameless plug. We have some good resources for using light meters with an explanation of the zone system at CiM. Follow the link in the sig
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  2. #22
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,727
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    dwdmguy,

    It is really simple; your meter, and most everybody else's, is just plain dumb. You on the other hand are not dumb.

    You know (or can know), whether or not, what you are metering off of should be in "zone 5" or not.

    The trick is in knowing where the tones in your composition should fall and how much correction you should dial in from what your meter is telling you.

    Examples;

    When metering off a brighter than normal subject your meter will ask you to underexpose. Caucasian skin is normally brighter than normal mid-tones and falls in "zone 6". So when you meter off Caucasian skin with your Lieca you need to take what the meter says and offset the camera setting by 1-stop (the difference between zones 5 & 6). In this case open up 1-stop to put the skin in zone 6.

    When metering off a darker than normal subject your meter will ask you to over-expose. That same skin, at night by a campfire, might need to be in "zone 4" to keep the mood. In this case you would need to close down from what the meter is asking for by one stop (the difference between zones 4 & 5).

    Quote Originally Posted by dwdmguy View Post
    Thank you to each of you but could someone please walk me thru an example of doing this? It's becoming a bit confusing. Here's what I've got thus far, if indeed I'm correct....

    The meter in my Leica M6 is designed for zone V, so if that is in fact a netural gray, why would I not meter off of a Med. gray and then recompose and shoot. This is my disconnect but if you can just walk me thru an example it would help a great deal. Thank you so much again.
    Tom
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,159
    Tom: Really, consider picking up Phil Davis's book ( Beyond the Zone System ). Read about 30-40 pages on the way meters work, how gray cards are to be used ( not as you might think ), reflective vs. incident metering, how to relate your meter readings to the zone system and exposure, etc. Everyone here has been very, very informative. Mr. Davis's explanations are lucid, easy to comprehend, and only technical when they need to be. Now just get the book. Enough.

    Ed

  4. #24
    gainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,726
    Images
    2
    What does the averaging meter measure? Don't forget that the Zone System came from a very fine musician and photographer who saw the zones of a scene as analogous to the tones of the musical scale (the Western one at that). In the BTZS, you need know nothing about music. You need to know the scene's brightness range as the exposure meter shows it, in logarithmic units or f-stops and fractions thereof. You measure from shadow areas whrein your eye can see details to bright areas wherin your eye may distinguish, say, white clouds against a blue sky. Now you contrive a way to make that brightness range fit, eventually, on a printing paper that can display a certain limited brightnass range by first saving it on a film that has a much wider recordable brightness range than the paper, but it has a threshold below which it sees almost nothing. If you know that the film's near-nothing threshold is 3 f-stops below the average, then you can use your meter to measure the areas where your eye sees next to nothing, set your exposure meter as if your film is 3200 instead of the 400 it says on the box, and set your camera accordingly. Now, depending on how you develop your film, it's density range from that shadow to the brightest point of the scene that you want to record will "fit" on the paper of your choice. Thank the Deity for VC paper.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #25
    OMU
    OMU is offline

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    744
    Images
    67
    Hi,
    I have a M6 and this is my procedure:
    I have calibrated my exposing and development to find my E.I.

    Since I can’t spot meter with my Leica, because of the fact that I will have different motifs in one film, I meter in the palm of my hand in the shadow of my body, and open up one stop.

    This gives me satesfactoring result.

    But, and that is an important experience to me, before I found my own E.I, my negatives was often too thin. So, to establish one’s own E.I. is important. (Sorry for my English)

  6. #26
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,727
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by OMU View Post
    I meter in .... the shadow of my body, and open up one stop.
    OMU provides a perfect example of exposing for the shadows.

    I do this too with my FM2 by crouching down or bending over so that the camera/meter only sees my shadow. From that exposure setting I generally open the camera up two stops.

    For me that gets the detail I want in the shadows (like around someones eyes) and places the mid-tones nicely and typically retains nice details at the high end.

    Quote Originally Posted by OMU View Post
    But, and that is an important experience to me, before I found my own E.I, my negatives was often too thin. So, to establish one’s own E.I. is important. (Sorry for my English)
    OMU is right here too. You need to figure out what works for your shooting/developing style.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #27
    DJGainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    151
    Images
    25
    It's about realizing that the lower values (shadows and blacks) are more affected by exposure; the higher values (highlights and whites) are more affected by development.

  8. #28
    naeroscatu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Newmarket Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    846
    Images
    38
    I think there are few distinctions to be made:
    - What kind of pictures you usually take; using M6 I assume mostly street photography and environmental portraits. For that it is helpful to understand the zone system but almost impossible to use it by the book. Metering the back of your hand and opening up a stop it actually puts your shadows on Zone VI (caucasian skin) so your faces will be OK which covers your area of interest. Even if some highlights will be blown out by normal development, that will not be a big problem.
    - If you shoot landscapes (I doubt you will use M6 for that) then I suggest you follow the advice given by 2F/2F or buy the books suggested above and try to understand and apply ZS because in landscapes and even architecture shadows and highlights are important and must be kept under control through correct exposure (personal EI) and customized development.
    Mihai Costea

    "There's more to the picture
    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

    Galleries:My PN & My APUG

  9. #29
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,727
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by naeroscatu View Post
    Metering the back of your hand and opening up a stop it actually puts your shadows on Zone VI (caucasian skin) so your faces will be OK which covers your area of interest.
    Did you mean "skin in zone VI" instead of "shadows on zone VI"?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #30
    naeroscatu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Newmarket Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    846
    Images
    38
    Did you mean "skin in zone VI" instead of "shadows on zone VI"?
    Yes, sorry for the typo.
    Mihai Costea

    "There's more to the picture
    Than meets the eye." - Neil Young

    Galleries:My PN & My APUG

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin