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  1. #1
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Film extractor help

    So I accidentally rolled the leader back into the film casette.

    Does anyone have instructions on how to use one of those film extractors?
    Marko Kovacevic
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  2. #2
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I don't know what model you have; mine is a silver one with two identical J-ish shaped flaps, but less curled. You insert it into the felt so it curves correctly with the canister, and seperate the two halves. You roll the film leader as if you were pulling it further into the cartridge and you will begin hearing clicks. You want the film leader to end up between the two flaps, so stop after you hear a first click after a long pause (make sure there is good contact between the film and extractor.) Then you turn the opposite direction until it stops (2 turns or something.) Then you push the sliding halves back together and carefully pull it out of the cartridge while keeping the pressure on the spindle. The film should come out in between the two parts.

    The idea is similar with all of them.

  3. #3

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    Mine works like this.

    First you turn the film spool a few times in the normal direction, i.e. as if you are winding the film into the cassette (optional really, but I like to do this).

    Then you "close" the extractor so the two pieces are close together.

    Then you slip the end of the extractor into the film cassette.

    Then you open the jaws of the extractor by pulling back on a little tab on one of the pieces.

    Then you turn the film spool a few times as if to wind the film into the cassette, listening for a click.

    When you hear the click, stop turning immediately and then turn the spool backwards until you start to feel a little resistance, indicating that the film is jamming into the gap between the jaws of the extractor.

    Then you carefully close the jaws of the extractor by pushing in the piece you pulled outward earlier.

    Then keeping the jaws together, you pull the extractor out of the film cassette. It helps if you bend is slightly in the same direction as the curve of the cassette while you are extracting.

    With a little luck you will pull the end of the film out of the cassette. If not then try again.

  4. #4
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot guys! I thought I would have to throw this roll of film away, but I got it out!
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    I also saw somewhere online a trick where you trim a piece of film and use THAT to extract your film....I think the cut sprocket holes were supposed to grab the film or something


    I tried it from memory and never got it to work...it's discussed on this thread:

    http://photo.net/film-and-processing-forum/00JJJL

    some people also mentioned using double-sided tape

  6. #6
    David William White's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markok765 View Post
    Thanks a lot guys! I thought I would have to throw this roll of film away, but I got it out!
    Failure is not an option!

    I assume this roll was half-shot and you want to finish the roll.

    You can lick a leader until it is sticky, then slide it in and it will pull out the tongue, or you can pry off the cap, remove the film and wind it back onto a reloadable cartridge, or you can start over with a new roll and send what you've shot to a lab.


    Say, while I'm here I thought I'd mention something that I haven't seen mentioned here before...good trick to keep up your sleeve...

    If anyone's in the habit of rewinding and swapping films in mid-roll, you might consider 'registering' your film when you load it the first time. This means marking a spot in your film transport guide (permanently), then using a marker to mark the film where it lines up against your registration mark. This way, you can later reload and line up the frames. Besides cutting wasted "safety margin" frames, you can also do in-camera multiple exposures and know where everything is going to be. For instance, if there is a nice full moon, mount your longest lens, and put the moon in a known location in the frame. Shoot the whole roll, same moon in same quadrant in all frames, then at your leisure, do some nighttime shots around town, re-registering the film so you know where the moon is going to show up. I'm sure there are other applications.

    Sorry for highjacking the thread...hope it's up the same alley.

  7. #7

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    interesting...

    I have always wanted to do a similar trick with 120 cameras---since I can just register the film using the window at the back & peek at frame numbers

  8. #8
    Markok765's Avatar
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    I'll remember that! Actually I just wanted to check out if my XA light seals were still good, and so I rewinded the film, but I did it a bit too much.
    Marko Kovacevic
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    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    BTW modern cameras count sprocket holes with an infrared sensor so the frames always line up. No rulers required!

  10. #10
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    BTW modern cameras count sprocket holes with an infrared sensor so the frames always line up. No rulers required!
    My Nikon F5 doesn't use a IR sensor, how does it count then?
    Marko Kovacevic
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