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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomassauerwein
    Don, I still have 30+ rolls of Ilford 50 speed 120 that I would'nt give to an enemy. Not having used your problem film I have no comparison but I certainley understand your frustration.
    So what are you going to do with them? Sounds like something I'd have fun playing with.

    Well, I don't consider you my enemy. It's in the fridge I just keep, in the back of my mind thinking someday I'll try to figure the film out. The film has a powdery charchol look to it once printed it's a unique look that could be interesting with the right subject matter, but it's several years old now and not being wine I'm guessing I will probably toss it. Every time I do want to experiment I get flashbacks to all the frustration and lost images this horrible film caused.

  2. #12
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomassauerwein
    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomassauerwein
    Don, I still have 30+ rolls of Ilford 50 speed 120 that I would'nt give to an enemy. Not having used your problem film I have no comparison but I certainley understand your frustration.
    So what are you going to do with them? Sounds like something I'd have fun playing with.

    Well, I don't consider you my enemy. It's in the fridge I just keep, in the back of my mind thinking someday I'll try to figure the film out. The film has a powdery charchol look to it once printed it's a unique look that could be interesting with the right subject matter, but it's several years old now and not being wine I'm guessing I will probably toss it. Every time I do want to experiment I get flashbacks to all the frustration and lost images this horrible film caused.
    Well, being a fine grained slow film it will probably last like Azo. I would think a POTA developer or technidol or maybe stand development would bring out the best in the film. I've used it and got pretty clear shadows, so it needs more exposure and less development that I was treating it to. I was seriously impressed by the detail and fineness of the grain though and would love to play with more. Think you would want to part with it?

  3. #13
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    Not to mention the edges on BPF 200 are rougher than my wifes nail file. It's almost like they use a pizza cutter to cut it. I e-mailed the rep to ask what gives twice and never even got a reply. I gave up on it.

  4. #14
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    I've just finished completing development/density testing on ClassicPan 200 (aka BPF 200), using HC-110 Dil H (1 stock:15 water), and PMK 1:2:100.

    I had no problem getting excellant densities in either soup, although my E.I.'s are 20 and 25 respectively. That's fine by me.

    I live in Canada, and thought that J&C had the cheapest price on this film ($11.99 U.S. per 25 sheet 4x5),...well they do, in the States. But in Toronto, Eight Elm Photo/Video sell the same film packaged as FortePan 200 & 400 for $21.00 CDN per 25 sheet box. (4x5) This saves me even more money, as it cuts out the Customs/Duty charges at the border.

    I agree that the film is a little rough around the edges,...maybe that's why they go to so much trouble with the packaging. It doesn't present any problems for me, because I develop either one sheet at a time, or multiples by using the six sheet tray from summitek [http://www.summitek.com/][/url]

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paddy
    I've just finished completing development/density testing on ClassicPan 200 (aka BPF 200), using HC-110 Dil H (1 stock:15 water), and PMK 1:2:100.

    I had no problem getting excellant densities in either soup, although my E.I.'s are 20 and 25 respectively. That's fine by me.

    I live in Canada, and thought that J&C had the cheapest price on this film ($11.99 U.S. per 25 sheet 4x5),...well they do, in the States. But in Toronto, Eight Elm Photo/Video sell the same film packaged as FortePan 200 & 400 for $21.00 CDN per 25 sheet box. (4x5) This saves me even more money, as it cuts out the Customs/Duty charges at the border.

    I agree that the film is a little rough around the edges,...maybe that's why they go to so much trouble with the packaging. It doesn't present any problems for me, because I develop either one sheet at a time, or multiples by using the six sheet tray from summitek [http://www.summitek.com/][/url]
    I am happy that you experienced the results that you want with the material. My complaint with this film, which I still maintain, is that it fails to build density range (aka contrast). This is a deficiency in the material when one wants to expand contrast to the levels that one would want for Azo or alternative printing (1.60 in the case of grade two Azo). Additionally this is a bothersome aspect when one wants to expand a low brightness ratio scene into a greater contrast. I found that with development times of 18 minutes with 2-2-100 Pyrocat that I was not able to expand the film past one zone of expansion. I found myself printing these negatives at grade five and they will need further intensification or contrast masking to achieve the results desired. This requires additional time that I would rather spend in exposing film.

    Granted, if one overexposes the film by three stops, it should build density. I have no doubt of that. But building density range is another matter in my experience. Good luck to you in your photography.

  6. #16

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    Paddy mentions in his posting that Classic Pan200 is AKA BPF200 & then later states it is the same film packaged as FortePan 200. Could someone please clarify for me .......Are these 3 films in fact the same film?

  7. #17

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    Nope they are not Annie. Fortepan 200 and Classic 200 are the same. BPF is Bergger.

    I agree with Don about Bergger. Besides if you need a 200 ASA film, why buy Bergger when Classic/Fortepan 200 is available and cheaper (at least where I buy mine) - and so much better!

  8. #18

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    Whew! That's a relief ..... I just made an order to J&C for more of the Classic 200 and thought I might be in for the same problems that Don was having. Ordering from J&C is cheaper for me too and I am in Canada. There is no duty on photographic film entering Canada and Customs charges a flat $5 'handling fee' per package regardless of contents. The taxes that we pay on film imports in British Columbia are the same as those when purchasing domestically so for me J&C is cheaper than 8 Elm as the shipping & taxes are about the same.

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