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  1. #1

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    Low contrast developer for slow films (35mm) - am I getting this right?

    I've shot loads of HP5+ and Tri-X over the last year or so, and rated it at anything from ISO 200 to 3200 - and developed in Xtol and Ilford Microphen. I have also done quite a bit of the Adox CMS 20 (high resolution) film, always developed in Adotech.

    I like to shoot fast lenses wide open, and with summer coming up, I have to think about some slow films to help me do this. The Adox/Efke KB25 film sounds interesting, since I would like to try an "older" emulsion. I have seen negatives that have a beautiful curve, with a broad spectrum of grey tones - which I haven't been able to get with CMS 20/Adotech.

    I understand that Adox/Efke 25 (and 50) are rather high in contrast, and it is recommended to use low contrast developers. Would Rodinal (1+100) work for this? Or are there others that I should check out?

    I spend a lot of time on the Greek Islands every summer, so I expect high contrast lighting. With high contrast film as well - I'll need something to tame it.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    I think Ilford Perceptol could be a good choice. You can use it stock or maybe diluted and usually it works well for high contrast subjects.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The Efke/Adox 25 & 50 aren't particularly high contrast, I shoot the 25 alongside Delta 100 & 400 and process in Pyrocat HD with similar dev times.
    I'm mainly shooting in the same conditions you're asking about, I can see Greece from where we live

    In fact I've been using Adox KB14 (now know by it's ASA speed of 25 rather than the older 14 Din) since the early 70's and have always used my usual developer.

    Ian

  4. #4

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    You may get many replies on this subject. There are compensating developing techniques to produce lower contrast negatives of of high contrast subjects. I'm no expert at this.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  5. #5

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    Kodak 5231 movie film stock.

    I've been using Kodak 5231, which is Plus-X movie stock. It is low contrast and works well at EI 80 in D-76 1+3. Tom Abrahamsson wrote to me: "The 5231 is a good film, try it with Beutler developer 1 part A, 1 part B and 10 parts water for around 6.5 to 7 minutes. Great midrange tones.
    Tom"

    There is a long discussion on this film and Kodak 5222 Double-X and various developers at Rangefinder Forum. Link: http://tinyurl.com/EK5222-EK5231. There is info there on where to buy it.

    I have not tried the Beutler yet. I do agree that 5231 has gloriously rich midtones.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by patashnik View Post
    I understand that Adox/Efke 25 (and 50) are rather high in
    contrast, and it is recommended to use low contrast developers.
    Would Rodinal (1+100) work for this? Or are there others that
    I should check out?
    For full film speed some compensation will likely be needed.
    Rodinal at 1:200 would be a good bet. Two or three inversions
    every two of three minutes will allow for developer depletion
    in the more dense areas of the film.

    I'd use D-23; 1:7, a 120, 500ml. D-23 has metol as it's
    developing agent. Metol is bromide inhibited. As bromide,
    a by product of development, builds in the more dense areas
    it slows development. That plus developer depletion makes for
    great compensation. In addition D-23 is a moderately active
    developer so delivers fine grain. Dan

  7. #7

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    Thank you all for your helpful replies, I'll have a look around to see what I'm able to find in the local shops



 

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