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  1. #11
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    I took an approach similar to that of @John Powers; I took the operating fan/heater head unit from an old Prinz film dryer and cleaned it up. I got this on eBay, cheap. I replaced its filthy filter with furnace-filter material from Lowe's---thin sheet kind, also cheap.

    I took a piece of Closet Maid shelving material and cut it into a square the same size as the square cross section of one of those plastic clothing hanging bags you can get at Target or elsewhere. The shelving acts as a frame; the clothing bag replaces the Prinz unit's ripped, brittle, yellow original drying "sleeve." The shelving square goes into the bag against the square end, into which I've cut flaps to form a hole the size of the Prinz head. So the head sits atop the bag and blows warmed filtered air into the bag. I've cut a drip/air exit hole in the bottom of the bag. The whole thing is thus a positive-pressure bag to keep dust to a minimum while the film dries more quickly than drip-dry alone.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_0073.jpg   IMG_0074.jpg  
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  2. #12
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    A place to try film is very important in keeping dust off. In my experience, dust that settles on the wet emulsion is very difficult , sometimes impossible, to remove.

    My current darkroom did not start functioning until I built the drying cabinet. I have seen the mobile one John mentions is nice. I use a 'built in' unit, but it is basically a wardrobe cabinet from Home Depot. I also prefer to not have any heat or air blowing in the cabinet.

  3. #13
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    I also use a film drying cabinet. When turned on, it sounds like a jet engine trying to take off, and the fan inside would probably make a stump grinder, so I just use it as is and let them dry overnight.

    I love it and wouldn't go back to drying in my bathroom again.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  4. #14
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    For $165 you can make a very nice film drying cabinet to suit your own area, even a portable one if you like...

    The suggestion to use clothes storage enclosures goes back a long way, and they work. If you plan on making a permanent darkroom, look into making a cabinet out of the glossy coated Masonite sold for use in bathroom environments. It has a hard, smooth surface doesn't accumulate dust, and is easy to fabricate. Here's an example...

    It's 18x20x76" high, has 2 sheets of 3/6" plexiglass doors, and a series of 3/16" brazing rods projecting from the back wall for hanging film. I just finished developing 30 rolls of 220 film (they're cut in half and sleeved), and a couple of 8x20 negatives. The brazing rods are arranged so I can hang a lot of 4x5, 5x7, and 8x20 films without them dripping on each other.

    I have a simple heating pad on the floor to bring up the temperature on humid days. No fan... I don't want any air movement inside that chamber.
    When I have a lot of film in the cabinet, drying takes longer and the film doesn't curl as much.

    That cabinet has a downside... I tend to use it as a temporary storage closet untill I can get around to cataloging my films... it kind of happens when you develope tons of film and not enough time in the day...

    Reinhold

    More darkroom photo's at: www.classicBWphoto.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Film Dryer1.jpg   Film Dryer2 .jpg  

  5. #15
    jp80874's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=MikeSeb;782746] I've cut a drip/air exit hole in the bottom of the bag. QUOTE]

    Reading Mike’s description I remembered that I dealt with the few drips by covering the bottom of the closet with paper towels. I wasn’t sure what the bottom material was and if it would hold up to water. The paper towels absorbed most of it and then dried with the film. Maybe I ought to change them now that they are at least four years old. High maintenance.

    Thanks Mike and Dale (ic-racer)

    John

  6. #16

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    I built my own for hanging two rolls of 36exp 35mm out of wood. It has no dryer and the door doesn't even seal tightly, but it makes a world of difference. I let the film dry at least 4 hours in our 70 degree F. house.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  7. #17
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    Mike...

    What's the file size for your thumbnail attachments?
    If I try to attach a wallpaper size photo, (like yours), I get a gag order...

    My 4x6" files are about 150mb at 72dpi.

    Muchas grasias.

    Reinhold

  8. #18
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwdmguy View Post
    I'm about to purchase one at a price of $165 for a 6' tall filtered cabinet.

    Does this make a huge difference when drying as far as keeping down the dust etc?

    Thank you for any responses.
    T
    Does a Film Drying Cabinet help reduce dust - YES - a huge difference.

    Can you make one for less than $165 – again yes

    The real question is – for only $165 can you be bothered?

    Only you know the answer to that one

    Martin

  9. #19

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    I've started using a filtered cabinet and would never go back. My negs are MUCH cleaner than without.
    Vince Donovan

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbannow View Post
    I also use a film drying cabinet. When turned on, it sounds like a jet engine trying to take off, and the fan inside would probably make a stump grinder, so I just use it as is and let them dry overnight.

    I love it and wouldn't go back to drying in my bathroom again.
    That is what I do as well.

    Yes you could probably make one for yourself but for $165 you have one that is designed for the task and the job is done. You have better things to do with your time - like photograph.

    I rarely use the fan but like the fact that it is there if I need it. I can hang 35mm all the way through and including 12x20 sheet film.

    I acquired a pin registration punch and punch holes on the edge of the film and trimmed paper clips to give me a nice hanger and use two to hang the sheet film in the cabinet. I just let them air dry and never have a problem with dust.

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