Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,951   Posts: 1,557,950   Online: 1022
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 40
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Sarasota, FL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    921
    Another wise, reality based post from Doremus.

    I agree.

  2. #22
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,059
    Images
    33
    I strongly urge you to reclaim the silver from the chems. I dont think stop bath is harmful, except possibly to pipes, however spent developer, and stop, make great weedkillers. I spray along the edges of my drive, and walkways to keep the weeds down. They make great destroyers of poison ivy! I find this less harmful than the spent motor oils my neighbor uses(he's an ass)

  3. #23
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    Paul,

    I agree 100%... and on rare occasions I do dump a 5x7 tray of little used fixer down the drain. The silver introduced into the sewer system from that is less than minimal.

    That said, I think it is a good idea to minimize our impact and ecological footprint whenever and wherever convenient, so I recycle, ride my bike, reuse, shop second-hand, and properly dispose of my photochemicals as much as I can without disrupting my lifestyle. With some things (like possible toxins), it is a question of responsibility and ethics as much as a question of ecology; more potentially damaging things require more care in use and disposal. I wouldn't want my neighbor putting lots of potentially dangerous things into our shared groundwater (or even the sewer system), so I don't either as a general rule. But I'm not obsessive about it. Disposing of fixer and reusing selenium toner are "low-hanging fruit" that don't take a lot effort or time to dispose of responsibly.

    Best,

    Doremus Scudder
    www.DoremusScudder.com
    There are two kinds of users, those who use a lot of chemistries, and those who use very little.

    For those who use a lot, like commercial labs, you must follow local laws for the disposal of spent chemistries. For those who use a little, it's easy to dump your spent chemicals in a jug, and when the jug is full, take it to a household hazardous waste facility. If processing film using the Ilford Method, dump the washes into the jug as well.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dedham, Ma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    625
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    ....Seems far more simple to me than the evaporation technique, seems to pose less of a danger to various critters, makes spills less likely, and lets one avoid dealing with that dry residue (I am curious how you collect it and put it in a bag), which is more potentially harmful to ones person than the chemicals in liquid form.
    I've used this evaporation method, it's the simplest method when dealing with small volumes (a few gallons). The dry chemicals are handled like any dry chemical - don't breath in the dust, or wear a mask - and I have a large garage where I store the open 5 gal. plastic bucket(s). It only works during the hot summer weather.

    ralnphot offered a good tip - use fixer as a weed killer - that's an even simpler solution! I have lots of weeds. Thanks ralnphot, for that tip.

    Paul
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  5. #25
    Monophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,691
    Images
    44
    Back to the original question: are black and white photo chemicals harmful to residential plumbing. The answer is unequivocally NO! Residential plumbing uses copper, cast iron, galvanized steel, lead, or more commonly in modern homes, plastic waste piping. In some older neighborhoods, there may also be clay pipe in the main drain to the street. The only chemical that might raise any concern at all is acid stop, and the working strength solutions of that chemical are no more corrosive than ordinary oil and vinegar salad dressing.

    The potential harm to the environment is a separate matter. Yes, that is something that we need to be concerned about, but for most of us, the volume that we are dealing with is minuscule. I'm not convinced that the volume of fixer that I dispose of during the course of a year is enough to do any harm, but I'm not arrogant enough to try to tell other people about how they should deal with the issue. And I know that in some instances there are specific regulations that have to be met.
    Louie

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Dedham, Ma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    625
    The bleach-fix used for color processing is very corrosive, it will even damage stainless steel. The B&W fixer is known to corrode copper pipes if not diluted with water. I believe this is true because I have copper pipes that corroded (after many years) by whatever residual chemicals are present in the tap water - considered to be safe levels.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,562
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    8
    there is a company called itronics
    they recycle spent photochemistry and turn it into fertilizers.
    they are located in nevada ...
    they might have a local person where you are situated to recycle/reclaim
    your photochemistry.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    By the way, Daniel.

    This is what I do with my fixer, selenium, and whatever else I am unsure about: http://www.lacity.org/san/solid_reso...ters/index.htm.

    I go to the Los Feliz location, near the L.A. Zoo:

    4600 Colorado Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90039
    Hours of Operation:
    Saturdays and Sundays
    9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    If you are in Pasadena, take 210 west to 134 west to 5 south. Exit Colorado St., which is the first exit after getting onto 5, I believe. The ramp is a very long multi-lane ramp, and you want to get/stay in the right lane. There is another exit from the Colorado ramp, called Edenhurst. Take this exit. (Do not miss this exit, or it is a bit of a pain to turn around and get back to where you need to be.) Make a left onto the street at the end of the ramp (Colorado). Continue down the street a short distance and make a right into the driveway.

    It is free, quick, and easy. All it costs is time. Take anything there. Batteries, paint, rags, etc. Just make sure it is all labeled correctly so they know what to do with it.

    From the page:

    "We accept: paint and solvents; used motor oil and filters, anti-freeze, and other automotive fluids; cleaning products; pool and garden chemicals; aerosol cans; all medicine; auto batteries; household batteries.

    "E-waste: computers, monitors, printers, network equipment, cables, telephones, televisions, microwaves, video games, cell phones, radios, stereos, VCRs, and electronic toys.

    "We do not accept: business waste, ammunition, explosives, radioactive material, biological waste or tires. Bulky Items: furniture, refrigerators, washing machines/dryers, conventional ovens, paper, computer software.

    "Transportation limit for chemical related items: It is against the law to transport more than 15 gallons or 125 pounds of hazardous waste to collection sites. Please pack your waste properly to prevent tipping or spilling of the waste during transportation."
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-29-2009 at 03:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    813
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post

    4600 Colorado Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90039
    Hours of Operation:
    Saturdays and Sundays
    9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.


    Hey, that's where I go!
    .
    .
    .

  10. #30
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    By the way, Daniel.

    This is what I do with my fixer, selenium, and whatever else I am unsure about: http://www.lacity.org/san/solid_reso...ters/index.htm.

    I go to the Los Feliz location, near the L.A. Zoo:

    4600 Colorado Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90039
    Hours of Operation:
    Saturdays and Sundays
    9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

    If you are in Pasadena, take 210 west to 134 west to 5 south. Exit Colorado St., which is the first exit after getting onto 5, I believe. The ramp is a very long multi-lane ramp, and you want to get/stay in the right lane. There is another exit from the Colorado ramp, called Edenhurst. Take this exit. (Do not miss this exit, or it is a bit of a pain to turn around and get back to where you need to be.) Make a left onto the street at the end of the ramp (Colorado). Continue down the street a short distance and make a right into the driveway.

    It is free, quick, and easy. All it costs is time. Take anything there. Batteries, paint, rags, etc. Just make sure it is all labeled correctly so they know what to do with it.

    From the page:

    "We accept: paint and solvents; used motor oil and filters, anti-freeze, and other automotive fluids; cleaning products; pool and garden chemicals; aerosol cans; all medicine; auto batteries; household batteries.

    "E-waste: computers, monitors, printers, network equipment, cables, telephones, televisions, microwaves, video games, cell phones, radios, stereos, VCRs, and electronic toys.

    "We do not accept: business waste, ammunition, explosives, radioactive material, biological waste or tires. Bulky Items: furniture, refrigerators, washing machines/dryers, conventional ovens, paper, computer software.

    "Transportation limit for chemical related items: It is against the law to transport more than 15 gallons or 125 pounds of hazardous waste to collection sites. Please pack your waste properly to prevent tipping or spilling of the waste during transportation."
    One comment, for folks anywhere, when it doubt, call your city, ask for the department that looks after household waste, they will tell you where you can take hazardous waste, and other household wastes. Often they can assist you, either they can tell you where to drop off stuff or can arrange a pickup, and that includes hazardous wastes.

    The limit that you put there, applies only to California, other states, provinces or countries have their own limits, which may be more or less.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin