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Thread: Kodak T-max 100

  1. #1
    LF2007's Avatar
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    Kodak T-max 100

    I have some old Kodak T-max 100 film which expired in 2001 but has always been in the freezer. I want to shoot a test roll, what developer do I have to use to develop this film. Can I use regular Rodinal or Diafine? Sorry if I'm ignorant but I never used T-Max 100 before.

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    Good Afternoon, LF2007,

    A SEARCH here on APUG will give numerous expressions of expertise/opinion on this topic. Personally, I prefer T-Max Developer 1:7 from concentrate, with 10 minutes as a starting point. Some advocate using an E. I. of 50, others 80, others box speed. You'll need to experiment a little.

    Konical

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    TMax developer is ok, but too expensive for what it is. It is ok for push processing; but if that's not part of your plan then good old D-76 is inexpensive and good for box speed. Just follow the directions and you're good to go.
    Frank Schifano

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    Just my opinion, but in reviewing posts here and interviewing people with extensive wet darkroom experience in preparation for developing the T-Max 100 which I've been shooting, I've come to the understanding that undiluted D-76 will do just fine--especially if you want to start with a simple and reliable process. Refrigerated film is not likely to present a problem.
    "Get over it."

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    If the film was refrigerated or frozen, then you shouldn't have problems with fogging. Not from 2001, that's not too bad.

    But I personally don't like T-MAX. I tried it one time, and developed it with D-76. To me, it seemed to be very unforgiving with exposure. Everything was either lost in shadows or bleached white. It had too much contrast, and just gave kind of a harsh, cold tone to everything. It's hard to describe. I shot a roll of Plus-X the same day in the same lighting conditions and it turned out okay. But T-Max was very picky about exposure. I just didn't like the look of it at all. I did try it once with doing long exposures indoors, and it was okay. But for outdoor photos, I hated it. I usually like Kodak films, especially Plus-X, and the new Ektar 100 when I take color photos. But I just hated T-Max.

    - Chris

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    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    You'll likely get 100 different ideas from as many photographers.

    TMax developer is a great start - I always had great results from it and many feel there's no need to change from it. I really like it in Rodinal FWIW - sharp sharp sharp and slightly increased speed as a result. Again, FWIW, I've noticed TMax dev. is a little 'softer' in appearance and Rodinal sharper.

    But again, that's strictly personal observation. Try it, see for yourself. I like this film.

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    2F/2F's Avatar
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    The standard answer: Any b/w developer will give you outstanding results if you are consistent and do some testing before getting rolling with a batch of film.

    The Kodak answer would probably be that T-Max films are at their best from a technical standpoint when developed in T-Max developer at 75F.

    I would be inclined to use T-Max developer, myself. I say this because any time I would use T-Max myself, I would choose it only for some technical reason with a specific and uncommon, not for general-purpose use. Therefore, I would want to get the very best out of the film that it has to offer.

    If I used T-Max all the time for general use, I would not use T-Max developer, as it is expensive, and I would want to just use the same general-purpose developer that I use for everything else. (In my case, this is Ilfotec HC/HC-110.)
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    Of course, "the best out of the film that it has to offer" is pretty open to interpretation; like saying, I want a camera that takes good pictures.

    Fine grain, sharpness, film speed, etc. No easy one-size-fits-all answers, hence "100 different answers".

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    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Corneau View Post
    Of course, "the best out of the film that it has to offer" is pretty open to interpretation; like saying, I want a camera that takes good pictures.

    Fine grain, sharpness, film speed, etc. No easy one-size-fits-all answers, hence "100 different answers".
    From a technical standpoint is what I meant by that. If I go to use T-Max 100, it is in a special case where I want everything that Kodak claims about the film. For general purpose use, I would use my normal developer.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-20-2009 at 11:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Tmax 100 is fine film that lasts well. I had some a while back that expired in 1996 and it was just fine. I used either Pyrocat-HD or Rodinal to process it, with great results.
    Very sharp, beautiful tonality and a nice thick film base that lies flat when you scan/print.

    Have fun! And I think you will, because this film looks good in anything you'll throw at it as long as you spend some time in finding what works for your purposes. That really is the key - to spend time with it and learn how the film works in different lighting situations, etc.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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