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  1. #1
    MFP
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    HP5+, what developer for this look?

    Hey APUG,

    So I had these two images of Ilford HP5+ film developed through a service that sends out their B&W film before I could develop my own negatives, and then printed them in my darkroom a while later on some ILFORD MGIV paper. I love the look of this entire roll, and I want to know what film developer I could possibly use to get a similar look with future rolls. I have tmax dev ready, but I have a feeling it will not create the desired effect as tmax is, i believe, meant for detail in shadows and finer grain.

    Thanks for responding
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image10 (1).jpg   Image11 (1).jpg  

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    Are those 35mm? I use HC-110. If you want to kick up the contrast and grain, just agitiate a bit more with slightly longer dev time.

  3. #3
    MFP
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    they are in fact 35mm. Would agitating for 5 sec. every 30 sec. make a difference over 10 sec. every 60 sec. in increasing contrast?

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    Any general-purpose developer will do it. ID-11, HC, etc. The key is knowing how to get what you want from any developer, rather than assigning too much importance to the "built-in" differences between developers. If you like the contrast, that starts with exposure. Exposure can be tweaked to make your dark areas darker. Then you can develop until you get the lighter areas how you like them.

    I'd start by shooting the film as if it was a 500 film, and adding 10 - 15 % to your development.

    You can also call the lab and asked what they used. However, it will likely be different than consumer one-shot developers. But if you find out what they use, and come back here with the answer, I'll bet someone can tell you the off-the shelf "consumer" developer that is most similar.
    2F/2F

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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by MFP View Post
    they are in fact 35mm. Would agitating for 5 sec. every 30 sec. make a difference over 10 sec. every 60 sec. in increasing contrast?
    Not in my opinion. Agitation time over whatever dev time is used would be exactly the same. A little more contrast might be obtained by agitating more vigorously using a cocktail bartender type of shake.

    pentaxuser

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    MFP
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Any general-purpose developer will do it. ID-11, HC, etc. The key is knowing how to get what you want from any developer, rather than assigning too much importance to the "built-in" differences between developers. If you like the contrast, that starts with exposure. Exposure can be tweaked to make your dark areas darker. Then you can develop until you get the lighter areas how you like them.

    I'd start by shooting the film as if it was a 500 film, and adding 10 - 15 % to your development.

    You can also call the lab and asked what they used. However, it will likely be different than consumer one-shot developers. But if you find out what they use, and come back here with the answer, I'll bet someone can tell you the off-the shelf "consumer" developer that is most similar.
    I'm not sure that changing the way I expose things would make a difference, as I always expose things the same way, and the difference in contrast between HP5+ and other films I have shot is evident in very different exposure situations throughout the roll. Also I know that the shop did not push process in any way.

    I will definitely try increasing agitation and try the 'bartender method' as mentioned above. I'm wondering, however, if with such an agitation method, would tmax developer still be able to achieve the effect that is in the photographs that I linked?

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    This may sound like an odd question, but I'm not sure what you like about the images, because to me they look somewhat different. I don't mean that I don't like them, but if there is something about them that you can describe that you are after, that might help in getting an answer that you find helpful. Almost any developer could probably come close to what I am seeing in your images. I have loved the look of almost every image I have gotten with HP5 that did not have some major exposure or development problem and I wonder if it is HP5 that you are coming to love. I have used XTOL, TMAX developer, DDX, and PMK with HP5 and I really had no problems with any of them
    Good luck,
    Doug Webb

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    MFP
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    What I'm looking for is really the contrast and the "visible but not overly excessive" grain. Its the lack of boring, smooth grays that I see in kodak films that I have developed. I know that it is a large part the result of the film, but I'm basically trying to figure out if Tmax developer will give the results shown in the pictures or if I should need to use a different developer like XTOL. Basically it looks like it was pushed yet it wasn't.
    Last edited by MFP; 04-25-2009 at 09:31 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #9

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    Did you ask the lab what developer and processing methods they used? Temp.? Agitation? That shouldn't be too hard to replicate.

    Personally, I really enjoy my HP5+ negatives (120 & 4x5) exposed at 250 and developed in Xtol 1:3, continuous agitation in a Jobo tank, 68F for 10 minutes.

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    That's the same look I get from HP5+ rated at 1600, developed in Xtol 1:1 for 18-20 minutes, depending on temperature. Vigorous agitation for first 10", then 2 inversions per minute (on the minute) for first 12 minutes, then 4 inversions (again, on the minute) for the remaining minutes. Developed in a Paterson 2-reel tank, with Dallas water, early in the morning. Sorry, I got carried away. But the only part that isn't serious is the part about "early in the morning." But I also agree with Doug Webb--HP5+ is really versatile and responsive (I hope that's a fair paraphrase).

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