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  1. #21
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Without seeing a contact print or enlargement to a graded paper I don't see how to judge whether your contrast index is good or poor.

    If you're not going to do trad'l prints then use 'curve' or 'levels' adjustment in your photo editor, whilst paying close attention to the level of noise in the shadow and highlight details. If you start to see a lot of noise when you curve to the contrast that you want, then you may indeed have an issue. If not, well then fahgedaboudit.

    N.b. if scanning is going to be your workflow for now, then consider dev'ing in wd2d+. The negs will look kinda blah to the eye but they will scan very well (considerably better than you'd get with a non-pyro developer). With pyro negs you'll have plenty of latitude to 'curve' the scan. Just google around: pyro + scan and you'll get the story.

    But overall I agree with the above- too many variables, and it's almost impossible for us to advise something without actually seeing your negs. What an experienced b&w use can say straight away, if he/she has the neg in hand, is whether the contrast index is on track. But apart from adjusting the exposure/dev combination, there are many other ways to build contrast and so many different kinds of contrast, you just need to do some reading and maybe look for a result that you like and find out how it was done.

    Look up the spectral sensitivity chart for the efke and ask yourself what your yellow filter did.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #22
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    You cannot be guaranteed that exposue settings through a filter are 100 percent accurate. I always use the standard filter factor and do not rely on the meter. Morover, the color temperature of the light shall also affect the filter factor. As others have stated, you have too many variables involved for someone not looking directly at the negative; or with negatives you have not actually printed, to come to a definitive conclusion about your negatives.
    Since the overhwhelming number of poor negatives shot on this planet are caused by under exposure, and since your choice of film, time of day, metering through a filter on the lens all can compound an underexposure problem, just try to retrain your thinking to the obvious. Many experienced photographers, after doing a simple film-speed test, come to the conclusion that no film, when used outside the testing laboratory exhibits its true film speed; some of us routinely shoot all films at one half ISO because an underexposed negative cannot be corrected: if the detail is not there, it cannot be created using blue smoke and mirrors. A neg that is a bit heavier can always be printed down.
    Lastly, you have chosen a film-type which is notorious for being unforgiving of exposure error. The slow black and white films are the films for which accurate (tested under your particular conditions) exposure is vital.
    I know from experience EFKE 25 is capable of outstanding pictorial results. I have been shooting it since the old days when it was made in Germany by Schleussner, a Dupont-owned company. But it is not tolerant of error: typisch Deutsch perhaps.(vbg)
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #23
    RobertV's Avatar
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    Look up the spectral sensitivity chart for the efke and ask yourself what your yellow filter did.
    A good question!



    Up from 620nm (red) the sensitivity is completely gone. A reason to check the film out without (Yellow) filtering.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Without seeing a contact print or enlargement to a graded paper I don't see how to judge whether your contrast index is good or poor.

    If you're not going to do trad'l prints then use 'curve' or 'levels' adjustment in your photo editor, whilst paying close attention to the level of noise in the shadow and highlight details. If you start to see a lot of noise when you curve to the contrast that you want, then you may indeed have an issue. If not, well then fahgedaboudit.

    N.b. if scanning is going to be your workflow for now, then consider dev'ing in wd2d+. The negs will look kinda blah to the eye but they will scan very well (considerably better than you'd get with a non-pyro developer). With pyro negs you'll have plenty of latitude to 'curve' the scan. Just google around: pyro + scan and you'll get the story.

    But overall I agree with the above- too many variables, and it's almost impossible for us to advise something without actually seeing your negs. What an experienced b&w use can say straight away, if he/she has the neg in hand, is whether the contrast index is on track. But apart from adjusting the exposure/dev combination, there are many other ways to build contrast and so many different kinds of contrast, you just need to do some reading and maybe look for a result that you like and find out how it was done.

    Look up the spectral sensitivity chart for the efke and ask yourself what your yellow filter did.
    Yes, I see lotsa noise when I bump up the contrast. So for what I've understood I've got real underexposed negatives here. It makes sense: messing up the homebrew d76 formula is real hard!

    Now the only thing that I can do is to develop another strip with d76 but for 8-9 minutes instead of 6,5...
    Let's see what happens, I will post the results tonight...

  5. #25
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    I know from experience EFKE 25 is capable of outstanding pictorial results. I have been shooting it since the old days when it was made in Germany by Schleussner, a Dupont-owned company. But it is not tolerant of error: typisch Deutsch perhaps.
    Yes, Sir it is if you know how to handle it. Dr. Schleussner was in the 50's and in that time this film was a revolution.

  6. #26
    RobertV's Avatar
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    Now the only thing that I can do is to develop another strip with d76 but for 8-9 minutes instead of 6,5...
    Yes, a good idea and do not use the Yellow filter. You have to adjust at least 1 1/2F stop for a medium Yellow filter and this film. Maybe you missed an F stop by TTL metering

  7. #27
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    when is best to use Efke100 versus lower Efkes films like in this case the Efke 25, or even the Efke 50? I am new to film so I had in mind ISO 100 for outside, bright light conditions, but isn't 25 really low?

  8. #28
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alessandro Serrao View Post
    Now the only thing that I can do is to develop another strip with d76 but for 8-9 minutes instead of 6,5...
    Let's see what happens, I will post the results tonight...
    Yep, I'd be inclined to cut up a not-so-important neg into test strips and develop in 1 minute increments past the time that you used last. Scan noise is often an indicator of underexposure/underdev. With scanner workflow, if you do err, then that error had better be on the side of overdevelopment. Most recent scanners can handle high dmax (up to 4 or so); what they can't handle very well are thin negs... they (and your software) simply don't have the bit depth. An overdeveloped neg simply looks grainy but at least its 'naturally' grainy so it's not a disaster. A thin neg scans to electronic rubbish.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  9. #29
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Just processed some 10x8 EFKE 25 shot at 50 EI processed in Pyrocat HD and as usual the negatives are outstanding, I started using KB25 back in the 70's with ID-11 (D76) and have always had good results.

    Quote Originally Posted by jaimeb82 View Post
    when is best to use Efke100 versus lower Efkes films like in this case the Efke 25, or even the Efke 50? I am new to film so I had in mind ISO 100 for outside, bright light conditions, but isn't 25 really low?
    The 25 ISO film is the best but only if you use a tripod, you'd be better usung the 100 ISO film to start with.

    Ian

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alessandro Serrao View Post
    Yes, I see lotsa noise when I bump up the contrast. So for what I've understood I've got real underexposed negatives here. It makes sense: messing up the homebrew d76 formula is real hard!

    Now the only thing that I can do is to develop another strip with d76 but for 8-9 minutes instead of 6,5...
    Let's see what happens, I will post the results tonight...
    ********
    Shoot at a lower Exposure Index first and do not over develop.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

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