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  1. #11

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Woonsocket, RI USA
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    35mm
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    Does it hurt any to leave the prints in an EVER-SO-SLIGHT state of being damp overnight?
    No. In fact, the only time I ever attempt to speed the drying of paper is when I need to evaluate it for color (for color prints) or exposure/contrast. Typically, I use the "high-tech" drying apparatus pictured in the attachment. IIRC, each of the racks was about $5-$10, not counting the trays underneath (which I clean up and use on the occasions when I want to make big prints).

    FWIW, every source I've read (books, on the Internet, etc.) says that when air drying, fiber paper should be dried face down on plastic screens or something similar. I've recently discovered that I get better results using the same vertical drying position I use for RC paper.

    2. If I make a print with a few MINISCULE white spots (I know its dust on the neg) would it hurt the neg to blow them off using compressed air, held away from the neg so as not to assault it with a gust?
    I know that many people do this. I myself use a negative blower brush for cleaning negatives. It's got a squeeze bulb that squirts a little air out, but not nearly as much as a can of compressed air. Mostly it's the soft bristles that get rid of the dust.

    3. I have an OLD two board easel that gives fuzzy edges to the image I can crop but the paper doesn't lay PERFECTLY flat on the easel. Short of laying a piece of glass on top is there a trick to flattening the paper out for focus' sake? A small piece of tape affixed to the back perhaps?
    My trick is to counter-roll the paper prior to exposure -- that is, I roll it into a tube, forcing it against its natural curl. This helps keep it flat, at least for the short time it takes to make an exposure.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hightech-paper-drying.jpg  

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