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  1. #11
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poohblah View Post
    Quick question:
    Which would be better for film storage? I keep my film in the fridge, and I usually take it out (and sometimes leave it in the hot interior of a car) an hour or so before a photo shoot. I've never used film that's more than a year old. I also use 100 speed film nearly exclusively. So I would assume that storing the film in the fridge is just fine and offers no noticeable benefit over the freezer, yes? It seems to me that storing film in the freezer is impractical for me since I would have to wait for it to thaw before shooting.

    Where do we draw the line between freezer and fridge? When storing high speed or IR films? When storing potentially past the expiry date?
    What I always did was this:

    Short term storage, under 1 month, camera bag.
    Moderate term storage, under 3 months, fridge
    Long term storage, over 3 months, freezer.

    This applies to film where refrigerator storage is not required, for films where it is, then:

    Short term storage, less then 1 day, camera bag
    Moderate term storage, less then 3 months, refrigerator
    Long term storage, over 3 months, freezer.

    Right now I have one roll in the camera bag, and everything else is in the freezer.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I keep all the film in the freezer along with the Gin.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #13
    3 Olives's Avatar
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    I've never had a need to store film before. However, I just bought some expired film that was stored in a freezer. Is it okay to just put it in the freezer in a Zip Lock bag or should I wrap it in something else first? Thanks.

  4. #14
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Olives View Post
    I've never had a need to store film before. However, I just bought some expired film that was stored in a freezer. Is it okay to just put it in the freezer in a Zip Lock bag or should I wrap it in something else first? Thanks.
    Either way is good.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #15
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    Fidge or cupboard. The freezer is overkill.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Fidge or cupboard. The freezer is overkill.
    It's 6 to 10 years old and was discontinued 5 yrs. ago. I don't intend to use more than 1 or 2 rolls a month. Also, I will buy more if I like the results.

  7. #17
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    All color film slowly changes color balance as it ages. The fridge simply slows this. The freezer slows it more. The older something is, or the more unknown its past storage conditions are, the more likely I will move it from the fridge to the freezer to slow its aging until I can test a piece of it.

    The fridge mostly houses my RA and black and white paper, and black and white film, while the bulk of my color film (and all my Ilfochrome paper) goes in the freezer. I only put b/w in the freezer if it happens to be a better use of available space in that instance.

    I keep some color film that I may need to grab and shoot within a few hours in the fridge (plus all my 4x5, simply because it fits better in the fridge than in the freezer right now). For 35, I usually have a pro pack of Fuji Press 800 in there, some HP5 and Delta 1000, and Provia 400X and T64. For medium format, at least a few rolls each of 100 transparency film, Reala, 160 neg film, 400 neg film, and 800 neg film (plus all the black and white, of course: HP5, Delta 1000, and Tri-X in 220).

    I also generally keep some 35mm at room temperature: four rolls of Fuji Press 800, two rolls of Provia 400X, four rolls of HP5, two rolls of Delta 1000, and one roll of T64 (and all my paper larger than 11x14, simply because it does not fit in the fridge).

    So, for long term storage of color film, storage of any material that is already old, and storage of IR films, I would use the freezer. For anything that you might need to grab and shoot within a few hours, I'd use the fridge (though I have pushed this to 1/2 hour in my pants pockets, and nothing bad happened). For anything you might need to grab and shoot right away with no delay, I would leave it at room temp.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-21-2009 at 05:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  8. #18
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    I put all my slide film and my seldom-shot B&W film in the freezer; I also have been known to yank it right out of the freezer and put it in the camera straight away. Never had any trouble doing this.
    f/22 and be there.

  9. #19
    GJA
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    Freezer, in a seal-a-meal vac seal bag. I store mine in the freezer simply because my family doesn't really eat food from there as much as the fridge. Therefore, the film doesn't get in the way as much, ad doesn't get moved.

    Additionally, in the freezer, there are no liquids (at least not in mine) so there is no real chance for a spill.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I put all my slide film and my seldom-shot B&W film in the freezer; I also have been known to yank it right out of the freezer and put it in the camera straight away. Never had any trouble doing this.
    Conditions really matter a lot to, if it's very dry out, and there is little moisture in the air, and this can work. I have done this in the winter when the camera and bag are at -20℃ then it really doesn't matter if the film went into the bag frozen, refrigerated or at room temperature. I have a winter camera, an elderly Konica TC, a mechanical film camera with a non-functioning meter. I have put that camera around my neck, left it outside my jacket all day and not lost so much as one exposure to the cold, even though the camera has not been winterized.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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