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  1. #1
    Poohblah's Avatar
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    Freezer or Fridge?

    Quick question:
    Which would be better for film storage? I keep my film in the fridge, and I usually take it out (and sometimes leave it in the hot interior of a car) an hour or so before a photo shoot. I've never used film that's more than a year old. I also use 100 speed film nearly exclusively. So I would assume that storing the film in the fridge is just fine and offers no noticeable benefit over the freezer, yes? It seems to me that storing film in the freezer is impractical for me since I would have to wait for it to thaw before shooting.

    Where do we draw the line between freezer and fridge? When storing high speed or IR films? When storing potentially past the expiry date?

  2. #2
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I just toss everything in the freezer. I don't think it has any real benefits for short term storage.

  3. #3
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    If you're only ever using film up to a year old, the fridge is fine. Once it gets a few years old, you're much better off using the freezer. It makes sense to have a stash ready in the fridge as it needs less time before you can shoot it.

  4. #4
    trexx's Avatar
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    I freeze film that will be in storage for an indeterminate duration. Like bulk rolls of Tech Pan. The fridge only holds my kodacrome, and IR that I could use at anytime. Everything else is in a bag on on a shelf.

    If you have a log of turnover I would recommend NOT to put in the fridge! ( plain old B&W file we are talking here )
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  5. #5

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    Has any one ever had a problem with condensation?

  6. #6
    Fraxinus's Avatar
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    I've always stored long-term items (Polaroid, colour reversal, some black & white readyload packs) in a freezer and never had condensation problems. I always let them come to room temperature for around 24 hours in their original wrapping (or plastic containers if 35mm cassettes).

    I've even stored big rolls of Fujicolor Pictrography paper in the freezer and had no problems provided that sufficient defrost time is allowed.
    Roy
    ----------------
    Real Photographs | Weeping Ash U.K.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "We cannot compete with those English fellows."
    - overheard by Alfred Stieglitz at the Joint Exhibition, New York City, 1891.

  7. #7

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    Microwave Oven.

  8. #8
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    I too store in the freezer and allow 24hrs to warm up. (Long term storage.) For short term, I store in the fridge.
    Haven't had a problem with this method and have been using it for 20 years.

    - Nanette
    www.nanettereid.com

  9. #9
    nicefor88's Avatar
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    I store in the cellar. Basement temperature is about 10-15 Celcius, that's cool enough I think to avoid problems. I never stored in a freezer, I really wonder if that's not a source of problems?
    I lived 10 years in tropical Asia and had problems a couple of times when leaving air-conditionned buildings, not with the films but with camera mirrors showing the "bathroom effect". Had to wait 15-30 minutes before the viewfinder got back to normal.

  10. #10
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    For short term storage or for films that are not going to expire soon, use the fridge. But, for film that are going to expire soon, I would use the freezer.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

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