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  1. #31
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    PE,

    My point is that the cars, roads and bridges are damaged by the over use of salt. Rochester should try doing what Canadians do => they just drive on top of the snow. No salt, just drive on it. That means they drive more slowly. They do not see how much they can slide the back end of the car when they go around a corner. Also they do not treat stop signs and traffic lights as though they were merely advisory.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  2. #32
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Why don't you work with your chemicals in your bathroom/shower/toilet area? I've had nearly the smallest bathroom (with bathtub) known to mankind and never once did I have the urge to use my kitchen for photo stuff instead. I do use recycled softdrinks bottles but they're now in such a state that no one would touch'em or mistake them for beverages... plus they're stored in the bathroom, who drinks softdrinks in the bathroom?
    ~Heather
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  3. #33

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    We have the same salt problem in buffalo, we have a rusty '91 240DL Volvo that has an inch of salt mixed into the rust!

    Ben

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer View Post
    Once upon a time there was a chemical plant near Morgantown, WV. All water puddles were sulfurous acid baths and all cars sooner or later had lace fenders. This was probably the stimulus for undercoating, which was originally applied after purchase. I don't know how many of you are old enough to remember that without being too old to remember it.
    I remember that. I even paid for an undercoating once. The car still rusted out. We use a lot of road salt here in the Northeast.
    Frank Schifano

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    I remember that. I even paid for an undercoating once. The car still rusted out. We use a lot of road salt here in the Northeast.
    Yup. Undercoating used to be an optional extra.....The good old days!!

    Bob H
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  6. #36
    bill spears's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akki14 View Post
    Why don't you work with your chemicals in your bathroom/shower/toilet area? I've had nearly the smallest bathroom (with bathtub) known to mankind and never once did I have the urge to use my kitchen for photo stuff instead. I do use recycled softdrinks bottles but they're now in such a state that no one would touch'em or mistake them for beverages... plus they're stored in the bathroom, who drinks softdrinks in the bathroom?
    As I've always lived by myself, I've got so used to having free reign of the house ! The days of improvising in small bathrooms and under the stairs cupboards etc are over. I guess though, if I were married with kids and all, it'd be a very different story.

  7. #37
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bill spears View Post
    As I've always lived by myself, I've got so used to having free reign of the house ! The days of improvising in small bathrooms and under the stairs cupboards etc are over. I guess though, if I were married with kids and all, it'd be a very different story.
    I may be married but I don't have kids. That's still not a good enough excuse to contaminate your food preparation area.
    ~Heather
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  8. #38
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    PE,

    My point is that the cars, roads and bridges are damaged by the over use of salt. Rochester should try doing what Canadians do => they just drive on top of the snow. No salt, just drive on it. That means they drive more slowly. They do not see how much they can slide the back end of the car when they go around a corner. Also they do not treat stop signs and traffic lights as though they were merely advisory.

    Steve
    Actually it depends on where you are in Canada. Out west it gets too cold for salt to be useful. so western cars last a long time. In Ottawa, we use LOTS of salt, the roads are clear and dry a few days after any snowstorm, (and ours are typically a foot of snow at a time) but a 12 year old car without some patches is rare.

    MY understanding is that Windsor/Detroit is on a BIG salt deposit and so there is a great deal of salt mined on both sides of the border.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmacd123 View Post
    Actually it depends on where you are in Canada. Out west it gets too cold for salt to be useful. so western cars last a long time. In Ottawa, we use LOTS of salt, the roads are clear and dry a few days after any snowstorm, (and ours are typically a foot of snow at a time) but a 12 year old car without some patches is rare.

    MY understanding is that Windsor/Detroit is on a BIG salt deposit and so there is a great deal of salt mined on both sides of the border.
    Toronto is the king of salt users, three flakes of snow in the air and they have already applied 5kg/cm². It's one of the reasons why I don't ride in the winter, I like my bike too much to see it eaten out from salt, and it's an AL frame
    Paul Schmidt
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  10. #40
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    Actually there is a whole lot more to the salt on roads story in Canada. Envioronment Canada - federal regulator- has deemed road salt to be a toxic substance.
    Road authorities are mandated by EC to develop salt management plans, and as other posters suggest - it is mostly an Eastern Canada thing to use road salt - on the western praries the winters are too cold for it to be effective. Some of the alternatives are more expensive magnesium 'salts'. The most innovation to come from the road salt reduction though, has been in the areas of brine application. The salt is pre dissolved in water to a mashed potatoes consistency and th slurry spread on the road. It goes to work right away, and therefore less salt as a whole is used. The other innovation is to make a thinner salt solution than mashed potatoes, and then spray it on the road to pre wet the surface of the asphalt with a salt soultion in advance of a pending snow storm. Most road authorities who do this just do pre-wetting upstream of intersections, where the prevention on ice bonding to the asphalt is most important.

    The biggest fly in this whole mix is that Montreal and Quebec City actually use the most salt per lane km of the major road authorities. Quebec has declared that salt management is a provincial issue, and the feds have not got the political gumption to take them on on this issue, so salt management in the whoe country is impacted -as in - 'Well, if you won't bust those guys, then why should I be trying harder.'

    One of my companiy's subsidiaries who shares our floor does all sort of environmental consulting, and a couple of the guys I work with on this floor deal with these issues all of the time.
    my real name, imagine that.

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