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  1. #1
    RobertV's Avatar
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    AM20/AM50 developer production ceased

    Unfortunately by the disappearance of the Amaloco plant in Ommen, Holland a lot of products are gone.
    Also the High Definition (non-staining) AM50 (60ml) developer from Amaloco. The content of this developer: Pyrocatechine, Sodiumsulfite and Sodiumhydroxide.

    It's a High Definition surface developer 1+29 in dilution.


    I would like to have a replacement for this developer.

    Is it wise to go back for a real Beutler type developer:

    A: Water 1000ml
    Metol 10g
    Sodiumsulfite 50g

    B: Water 1000ml
    Sodiumcarbonate 50g

    50ml A + 50ml B fill up till 500ml working solution.

    Or try the more simmilar Pyrocatechin surface developer according Windisch:

    A: water 100ml
    Pyrocatechin 8g
    Sodiumsulfite 1,25g

    B: 10% Sodiumhydroxide solution

    12ml A + 7 ml B fill up till 500ml

    What are the main expected differences about these developers?

  2. #2
    RobertV's Avatar
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    AM50 was working very well with Rollei Pan 25 and Efke 25 film.




    Rollei Pan 25 in AM50 1+29 for 5:00 Min.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The Pyrocatechin developer is a tanning developer and as such will give better edge sharpness, it will also be closer to the AM50 you were using. Johnson's Definol was also a Pyrocatechin based developer probably in the form of Meritol (Pyrocatechin/PPD).

    You could also try Crawley's FX-1 which is a variation of the Beutler developer.

    Ian

  4. #4
    RobertV's Avatar
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    I have here a modification of the (original) Beutler type where is suggested to add a very small amount of PotassiumIodid (0,001%) to improved the edge sharpness.


    For the FX-1 (high acutance) Crawley I have found:
    Water 750ml
    Metol 0,5g
    Sodiumsulfite 5,0g
    Sodiumcarbonate 2,5g
    PotassiumIodide 0,001% 5ml
    Fill up till 1000ml with water

    But this solution you can not keep long in stock.

    Question: What do you understand by Tanning? What is the difference of tanning and staining?

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Tanning is a hardening of the gelatin and is quite different to staining where a dye is produced during development. However they are often found together because Pyrogallol & Pyrocatechin are tanning developing agents as well as staining.

    The Pyrocatechin developer you listed will give some staining but as it's a surface developer it won't be particularly visible, staining helps to give a smoother tonality and gives the appearance of finer grain.

    FX-1 can be made uo as 2 part developers, Part B being the Carbonate which means the keeping properties will be greatly improved.

    Ian

  6. #6
    RobertV's Avatar
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    OK thank you very much. I was not aware about the technical English word "tanning".

    Yes, by reading further (Sammlung Fotografischer Rezepte) I have found the divided FX-1 formulae. It's real close to the Beutler recepture with KI modification.

    Thank you very much for some more inside information about these formulaes.

    Is there any disadvantage after recalculation of the 10.H2O Soda (Sodiumcarbonate) to use Na2CO3 . 10.H2O instead of Soda Sicc. ?

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertV View Post
    Is there any disadvantage after recalculation of the 10.H2O Soda (Sodiumcarbonate) to use Na2CO3 . 10.H2O instead of Soda Sicc. ?
    Crawley claimed you had to use a specific form of Carbonate at one time in FX-1 or FX-2 but these days the purity is much higher so it should make no difference.

    Ian

  8. #8

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    I`m sure there are suitable alternatives available. It`s not worth lamenting the passing of these film developers. Try Tetenal Neofin Blue or Paterson FX39.

  9. #9
    RobertV's Avatar
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    AM50 in a glass packing costs Eur. 2,71 and with this developer you can do 3-4 films.

    Neofin Blue/Blau costs Eur. 10,- for 5 films.

    Beutler recepture:
    A:
    1g Metol
    5g Sodiumsulfite
    B:
    5g Soda

    both filling up to 100ml water.

    For 4 films (1+1+10). Costs Eur. 0,30.

    For such a big difference what is in fact the same I will soup my films in my own brewery

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertV View Post
    For such a big difference what is in fact the same I will soup my films in my own brewery
    Don't forget the hops, try adding some Fuggles, helps the tanning

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