Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,050   Posts: 1,561,134   Online: 747
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26
  1. #11
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,335
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    Quote Originally Posted by jzhu View Post
    If there specific reason to reduced the development time by 10%?
    I find, and I think most will agree that development times posted on the internet and especially by manufacturers seem to be a bit too much. Better to underdevelop than overdevelop. Some will disagree. But for your first time developing I recommend reducing development time 10% then go from there, especially with Rodinal, which runs hot anyway.

  2. #12
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,335
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider View Post
    Just for my own interests, and when using these films, why would one want to use a solvent developer instead of a non-solvent one? What is the tonal range when using something such as D76, being that it's more or less considered a standard by which to judge films.
    Wayne, I would recommend non-solvent developers for slow, fine grain film. Using a solvent developer makes slow films look mushy. Obviously everyone has their own opinion. Even though D-76/ID-11 and Xtol are solvent developers once diluted to 1:1 and especially at 1:3 they act more like non-solvent developers. This would be a good starting point.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    18
    Thanks guys for all the suggestions. It will take me a while to understand your discussion.

    Accidentally, I found Rodinal in a local store, so I guess I will try rodinal 1:50 first. The question for now is: How many Rodinal is needed for one roll of 120 film?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Kuiper Belt
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    291
    >How many Rodinal is needed for one roll of 120 film?

    Enough to cover the film in the developing tank. Typically 500 ml. That means 10ml Rodinal and 490 ml of water. Or 10 + 500, to give 510 ml total. It won't make any functional difference which ratio you use.

    As mentioned above, keep the amount of agitation down, or the contrast will be strong, with little of the silvery mid-tones that most people find appealing. I agitate three times in the first minute, then once each three minutes.

    See http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php for developing times, and realize that some experimentation is almost always necessary to zero on the development results that you like.

    Keep a notebook. And good luck. [Larry in Kingston, Ont.]

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    18
    Thanks larry. However, my developing tank only holds around 500ml liquid. So with 510ml total solution, I won't have much space left in the tank. Is that ok? or can I get away with 9+450?

  6. #16
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,557
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Wayne, I would recommend non-solvent developers for slow, fine grain film. Using a solvent developer makes slow films look mushy. Obviously everyone has their own opinion. Even though D-76/ID-11 and Xtol are solvent developers once diluted to 1:1 and especially at 1:3 they act more like non-solvent developers. This would be a good starting point.
    Newbie question. What is the difference between a 'solvent' and 'non-solvent' developer? Why are there two kinds and how does each act on the emulsion?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  7. #17
    wogster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bruce Peninsula, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,266
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwysiwyg View Post
    Newbie question. What is the difference between a 'solvent' and 'non-solvent' developer? Why are there two kinds and how does each act on the emulsion?

    Short answer:

    A solvent developer contains one or more chemicals that dissolve the edges of the silver grains, giving the appearance of less grain. A non-solvent developer does not contain these chemicals, so grain is more apparent.

    Long answer, I will leave up to the chemical engineers.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #18
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI U.S.A.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,557
    Images
    3
    Paul,

    Makes perfect sense, softens the grain edges. Thanks, no longer answer necessary.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    887
    Quote Originally Posted by jzhu View Post
    I am plan to try some slow speed B&W films.
    I have the following list:
    1. Ilford Pan F 50
    2. EFKE 25
    3. Rollei Pan 25

    However, I am not sure what developer should I use for these films. I am also not sure about the development time for these film, cause there are so many versions online. I am looking for some recommendation for B&W developers and developing time for these film.
    By searching the Internet, Diafine looks like the easiest way to develop these films. Only need 3 mins in two develop bath. Anyone have good results using Diafine? Any other Suggestions? What about stop bath and fixer?
    Hope someone can give me some hints, and helps on this.

    Many Thanks in advanced.
    I prefer d76 or xtol.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by jzhu View Post
    ... can I get away with 9+450?
    You can get away with 4.5 + 445.5. I don't use Rodinal but the
    many posts I've read indicate about a 3ml bottom limit.

    If I were using D-76/ID-11 I'd likely go 1:7. I use a reduced
    sulfite D-23 at that dilution and like the results. Lots of
    compensation and the film's full speed. Dan

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin