Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,328   Posts: 1,537,153   Online: 858
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11
    KenS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    349

    large grain

    Quote Originally Posted by thefizz View Post
    You could try developing your film in paper developer.

    Peter
    Peter, development if film in a paper developer does not necessarily lead to larger grain.

    I recall, and will now have to see if see if I can find, a paper published about 15 or so years ago, where about 4 or 5 different films were developed in Dektol 1:32 for close to 20 minutes at 20°C provided the author good gradation and very fine grain.

    Ken
    Quando omni flunkus moritati (R. Green)

  2. #12
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,000
    Images
    2
    Try vigorous agitation; really shake the tank. I've had luck doing that with HC-110 and Tri-X @400. Whether agitation is the cause or not I'm not absolutely sure, however.

  3. #13
    BetterSense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,862
    Like anscojon says, just compose super-wide and crop. It's a simple foolproof geometrical way to increase grain.

  4. #14
    VincentM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Stockholm - SE
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46
    Thanks you all for the tips.

    I maybe need to understand better what influence grain before trying out things.
    I have been reading some threads about it and it seems that for the developer: high dilution, high temperature, vigorous agitation are somewhat the basis to play with while for films it is over exposition.
    This of course combined with an adequate couple film, developer. Tri-X and Rodinal (1:50, 1:100, ...) are the favorites by many, I ll start with it.

    Did i get correctly ? is there anything I missed?

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central NC
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    444
    Quote Originally Posted by VincentM View Post
    Thanks you all for the tips.

    I maybe need to understand better what influence grain before trying out things.
    I have been reading some threads about it and it seems that for the developer: high dilution, high temperature, vigorous agitation are somewhat the basis to play with while for films it is over exposition.
    This of course combined with an adequate couple film, developer. Tri-X and Rodinal (1:50, 1:100, ...) are the favorites by many, I ll start with it.

    Did i get correctly ? is there anything I missed?
    You do probably want to gain a better understanding before you spend a lot of time doing this. I suggest finding a copy of Anchell and Troop's The Film Development Cookbook. I think version 3 is out now. This will tell you much about films, developers, and techniques to use to create the graininess you want.

    The biggest factor in graininess is the film itself. Use the highest speed film you can get. Next is developer. A solvent developer like HC-110 is designed to give you small grain. You'll want to switch to an acutance developer. Then, graininess is directly related to density. So over expose and over develop. The resulting dense negative will take longer to print, but is perfectly printable (if you don't over do it of course) -- just with more grain then usual.

    Interestingly, agitation has no direct effect on graininess. I think this myth comes about because increasing agitation without compensating for the resulting increase in density by shortening development time, does increase graininess. But it's the increase in density that does it -- not the agitation itself. Nit picking? Maybe. But it's important to understand what is causing the effects you are seeing if you want to control those effects.
    Bruce Watson
    AchromaticArts.com

  6. #16
    RobertV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    the Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,057
    Even in medium format Fomapan 400 E.I. 400 in Rodinal 1+50 with a lot of agitation will give you enough regular grain where you can further dream this comming night from.

    Therefore Fomapan 400 + Rodinal is not filled in our data-sheet.

    Best regards,

    Robert

  7. #17
    VincentM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Stockholm - SE
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    46
    Thanks Bruce, nice and useful expanation

  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Valley Stream, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,216
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Watson View Post
    Interestingly, agitation has no direct effect on graininess. I think this myth comes about because increasing agitation without compensating for the resulting increase in density by shortening development time, does increase graininess. But it's the increase in density that does it -- not the agitation itself. Nit picking? Maybe. But it's important to understand what is causing the effects you are seeing if you want to control those effects.
    Nope, I don't think you're nit picking at all. In fact, I think you've made it quite clear to some folks who apparently don't get the whole concept of how time, temperature, and agitation are the three mutable variables that can be manipulated to obtain a desired result.
    Frank Schifano

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin